posts tagged: drawing*

  • Redmer Hoekstra (Netherlands)
Netherlands-based artist Redmer Hoekstra draws fascinating composite illustrations that merge animals and everyday objects or machines, from a lizard with computer keyboard scales to an owl with books for wings. At times he even brings three or more forms together, as with a whale emerging from a submarine, the entirety of which has the appearance of a banana. Whether you regard the pieces as humorous or slightly disturbing, it’s hard to deny the ingenious way each creature is formed. Hoekstra has more work over on Behance and you can pick up postcards, prints and other things in his shop. (src. Feel Design)
[more Redmer Hoekstra | artist found at nevver]
  • Redmer Hoekstra (Netherlands)
Netherlands-based artist Redmer Hoekstra draws fascinating composite illustrations that merge animals and everyday objects or machines, from a lizard with computer keyboard scales to an owl with books for wings. At times he even brings three or more forms together, as with a whale emerging from a submarine, the entirety of which has the appearance of a banana. Whether you regard the pieces as humorous or slightly disturbing, it’s hard to deny the ingenious way each creature is formed. Hoekstra has more work over on Behance and you can pick up postcards, prints and other things in his shop. (src. Feel Design)
[more Redmer Hoekstra | artist found at nevver]
  • Redmer Hoekstra (Netherlands)
Netherlands-based artist Redmer Hoekstra draws fascinating composite illustrations that merge animals and everyday objects or machines, from a lizard with computer keyboard scales to an owl with books for wings. At times he even brings three or more forms together, as with a whale emerging from a submarine, the entirety of which has the appearance of a banana. Whether you regard the pieces as humorous or slightly disturbing, it’s hard to deny the ingenious way each creature is formed. Hoekstra has more work over on Behance and you can pick up postcards, prints and other things in his shop. (src. Feel Design)
[more Redmer Hoekstra | artist found at nevver]
  • Redmer Hoekstra (Netherlands)
Netherlands-based artist Redmer Hoekstra draws fascinating composite illustrations that merge animals and everyday objects or machines, from a lizard with computer keyboard scales to an owl with books for wings. At times he even brings three or more forms together, as with a whale emerging from a submarine, the entirety of which has the appearance of a banana. Whether you regard the pieces as humorous or slightly disturbing, it’s hard to deny the ingenious way each creature is formed. Hoekstra has more work over on Behance and you can pick up postcards, prints and other things in his shop. (src. Feel Design)
[more Redmer Hoekstra | artist found at nevver]
  • Redmer Hoekstra (Netherlands)
Netherlands-based artist Redmer Hoekstra draws fascinating composite illustrations that merge animals and everyday objects or machines, from a lizard with computer keyboard scales to an owl with books for wings. At times he even brings three or more forms together, as with a whale emerging from a submarine, the entirety of which has the appearance of a banana. Whether you regard the pieces as humorous or slightly disturbing, it’s hard to deny the ingenious way each creature is formed. Hoekstra has more work over on Behance and you can pick up postcards, prints and other things in his shop. (src. Feel Design)
[more Redmer Hoekstra | artist found at nevver]
  • Redmer Hoekstra (Netherlands)
Netherlands-based artist Redmer Hoekstra draws fascinating composite illustrations that merge animals and everyday objects or machines, from a lizard with computer keyboard scales to an owl with books for wings. At times he even brings three or more forms together, as with a whale emerging from a submarine, the entirety of which has the appearance of a banana. Whether you regard the pieces as humorous or slightly disturbing, it’s hard to deny the ingenious way each creature is formed. Hoekstra has more work over on Behance and you can pick up postcards, prints and other things in his shop. (src. Feel Design)
[more Redmer Hoekstra | artist found at nevver]
  • Redmer Hoekstra (Netherlands)
Netherlands-based artist Redmer Hoekstra draws fascinating composite illustrations that merge animals and everyday objects or machines, from a lizard with computer keyboard scales to an owl with books for wings. At times he even brings three or more forms together, as with a whale emerging from a submarine, the entirety of which has the appearance of a banana. Whether you regard the pieces as humorous or slightly disturbing, it’s hard to deny the ingenious way each creature is formed. Hoekstra has more work over on Behance and you can pick up postcards, prints and other things in his shop. (src. Feel Design)
[more Redmer Hoekstra | artist found at nevver]
  • Redmer Hoekstra (Netherlands)
Netherlands-based artist Redmer Hoekstra draws fascinating composite illustrations that merge animals and everyday objects or machines, from a lizard with computer keyboard scales to an owl with books for wings. At times he even brings three or more forms together, as with a whale emerging from a submarine, the entirety of which has the appearance of a banana. Whether you regard the pieces as humorous or slightly disturbing, it’s hard to deny the ingenious way each creature is formed. Hoekstra has more work over on Behance and you can pick up postcards, prints and other things in his shop. (src. Feel Design)
[more Redmer Hoekstra | artist found at nevver]
  • Redmer Hoekstra (Netherlands)
Netherlands-based artist Redmer Hoekstra draws fascinating composite illustrations that merge animals and everyday objects or machines, from a lizard with computer keyboard scales to an owl with books for wings. At times he even brings three or more forms together, as with a whale emerging from a submarine, the entirety of which has the appearance of a banana. Whether you regard the pieces as humorous or slightly disturbing, it’s hard to deny the ingenious way each creature is formed. Hoekstra has more work over on Behance and you can pick up postcards, prints and other things in his shop. (src. Feel Design)
[more Redmer Hoekstra | artist found at nevver]
  • Redmer Hoekstra (Netherlands)
Netherlands-based artist Redmer Hoekstra draws fascinating composite illustrations that merge animals and everyday objects or machines, from a lizard with computer keyboard scales to an owl with books for wings. At times he even brings three or more forms together, as with a whale emerging from a submarine, the entirety of which has the appearance of a banana. Whether you regard the pieces as humorous or slightly disturbing, it’s hard to deny the ingenious way each creature is formed. Hoekstra has more work over on Behance and you can pick up postcards, prints and other things in his shop. (src. Feel Design)
[more Redmer Hoekstra | artist found at nevver]
  • Redmer Hoekstra (Netherlands)
Netherlands-based artist Redmer Hoekstra draws fascinating composite illustrations that merge animals and everyday objects or machines, from a lizard with computer keyboard scales to an owl with books for wings. At times he even brings three or more forms together, as with a whale emerging from a submarine, the entirety of which has the appearance of a banana. Whether you regard the pieces as humorous or slightly disturbing, it’s hard to deny the ingenious way each creature is formed. Hoekstra has more work over on Behance and you can pick up postcards, prints and other things in his shop. (src. Feel Design)
[more Redmer Hoekstra | artist found at nevver]
  • Redmer Hoekstra (Netherlands)
Netherlands-based artist Redmer Hoekstra draws fascinating composite illustrations that merge animals and everyday objects or machines, from a lizard with computer keyboard scales to an owl with books for wings. At times he even brings three or more forms together, as with a whale emerging from a submarine, the entirety of which has the appearance of a banana. Whether you regard the pieces as humorous or slightly disturbing, it’s hard to deny the ingenious way each creature is formed. Hoekstra has more work over on Behance and you can pick up postcards, prints and other things in his shop. (src. Feel Design)
[more Redmer Hoekstra | artist found at nevver]
Redmer Hoekstra (Netherlands)
Netherlands-based artist Redmer Hoekstra draws fascinating composite illustrations that merge animals and everyday objects or machines, from a lizard with computer keyboard scales to an owl with books for wings. At times he even brings three or more forms together, as with a whale emerging from a submarine, the entirety of which has the appearance of a banana. Whether you regard the pieces as humorous or slightly disturbing, it’s hard to deny the ingenious way each creature is formed. Hoekstra has more work over on Behance and you can pick up postcards, prints and other things in his shop. (src. Feel Design)
[more Redmer Hoekstra | artist found at nevver] Redmer Hoekstra (Netherlands)
Netherlands-based artist Redmer Hoekstra draws fascinating composite illustrations that merge animals and everyday objects or machines, from a lizard with computer keyboard scales to an owl with books for wings. At times he even brings three or more forms together, as with a whale emerging from a submarine, the entirety of which has the appearance of a banana. Whether you regard the pieces as humorous or slightly disturbing, it’s hard to deny the ingenious way each creature is formed. Hoekstra has more work over on Behance and you can pick up postcards, prints and other things in his shop. (src. Feel Design)
[more Redmer Hoekstra | artist found at nevver] Redmer Hoekstra (Netherlands)
Netherlands-based artist Redmer Hoekstra draws fascinating composite illustrations that merge animals and everyday objects or machines, from a lizard with computer keyboard scales to an owl with books for wings. At times he even brings three or more forms together, as with a whale emerging from a submarine, the entirety of which has the appearance of a banana. Whether you regard the pieces as humorous or slightly disturbing, it’s hard to deny the ingenious way each creature is formed. Hoekstra has more work over on Behance and you can pick up postcards, prints and other things in his shop. (src. Feel Design)
[more Redmer Hoekstra | artist found at nevver] Redmer Hoekstra (Netherlands)
Netherlands-based artist Redmer Hoekstra draws fascinating composite illustrations that merge animals and everyday objects or machines, from a lizard with computer keyboard scales to an owl with books for wings. At times he even brings three or more forms together, as with a whale emerging from a submarine, the entirety of which has the appearance of a banana. Whether you regard the pieces as humorous or slightly disturbing, it’s hard to deny the ingenious way each creature is formed. Hoekstra has more work over on Behance and you can pick up postcards, prints and other things in his shop. (src. Feel Design)
[more Redmer Hoekstra | artist found at nevver] Redmer Hoekstra (Netherlands)
Netherlands-based artist Redmer Hoekstra draws fascinating composite illustrations that merge animals and everyday objects or machines, from a lizard with computer keyboard scales to an owl with books for wings. At times he even brings three or more forms together, as with a whale emerging from a submarine, the entirety of which has the appearance of a banana. Whether you regard the pieces as humorous or slightly disturbing, it’s hard to deny the ingenious way each creature is formed. Hoekstra has more work over on Behance and you can pick up postcards, prints and other things in his shop. (src. Feel Design)
[more Redmer Hoekstra | artist found at nevver] Redmer Hoekstra (Netherlands)
Netherlands-based artist Redmer Hoekstra draws fascinating composite illustrations that merge animals and everyday objects or machines, from a lizard with computer keyboard scales to an owl with books for wings. At times he even brings three or more forms together, as with a whale emerging from a submarine, the entirety of which has the appearance of a banana. Whether you regard the pieces as humorous or slightly disturbing, it’s hard to deny the ingenious way each creature is formed. Hoekstra has more work over on Behance and you can pick up postcards, prints and other things in his shop. (src. Feel Design)
[more Redmer Hoekstra | artist found at nevver]
  • Curator’s Monday 148
Dirk Bach (b.1939, USA)
After enrolling in a drawing class, Dirk Bach discovered a strong interest in creating images and decided to pursue studies in the visual arts. He obtained a BFA from University of Denver in 1961 and an MA in painting in 1962. He has served as professor at the University of New Hampshire art department and the Rhode Island School of Design, where he taught drawing, painting, design, printmaking and art and architectural histories of Japan, China, India, and contemporary America. His own studio work focused firstly on landscape mandalas inspired by a National Endowment to the Humanities grant for travel to temples in Nara and Kyoto, Japan, and on Buddhist “Pure Land” diagrams based on imagery in the Lotus Sutra and Heart Sutra. These works led to several exhibitions and speaking engagements. His recent drawings of wooden boats in grassy fields reflect both his continued interest in far eastern art and his celebration of renewed personal vitality as a cancer survivor. Dirk Bach lives and works in New York with the artist Kay WalkingStick. Our sincere thanks to darksilenceinsuburbia for this Curator’s Monday.
[more Dirk Bach | Curator’s Monday with darksilenceinsuburbia]
  • Curator’s Monday 148
Dirk Bach (b.1939, USA)
After enrolling in a drawing class, Dirk Bach discovered a strong interest in creating images and decided to pursue studies in the visual arts. He obtained a BFA from University of Denver in 1961 and an MA in painting in 1962. He has served as professor at the University of New Hampshire art department and the Rhode Island School of Design, where he taught drawing, painting, design, printmaking and art and architectural histories of Japan, China, India, and contemporary America. His own studio work focused firstly on landscape mandalas inspired by a National Endowment to the Humanities grant for travel to temples in Nara and Kyoto, Japan, and on Buddhist “Pure Land” diagrams based on imagery in the Lotus Sutra and Heart Sutra. These works led to several exhibitions and speaking engagements. His recent drawings of wooden boats in grassy fields reflect both his continued interest in far eastern art and his celebration of renewed personal vitality as a cancer survivor. Dirk Bach lives and works in New York with the artist Kay WalkingStick. Our sincere thanks to darksilenceinsuburbia for this Curator’s Monday.
[more Dirk Bach | Curator’s Monday with darksilenceinsuburbia]
  • Curator’s Monday 148
Dirk Bach (b.1939, USA)
After enrolling in a drawing class, Dirk Bach discovered a strong interest in creating images and decided to pursue studies in the visual arts. He obtained a BFA from University of Denver in 1961 and an MA in painting in 1962. He has served as professor at the University of New Hampshire art department and the Rhode Island School of Design, where he taught drawing, painting, design, printmaking and art and architectural histories of Japan, China, India, and contemporary America. His own studio work focused firstly on landscape mandalas inspired by a National Endowment to the Humanities grant for travel to temples in Nara and Kyoto, Japan, and on Buddhist “Pure Land” diagrams based on imagery in the Lotus Sutra and Heart Sutra. These works led to several exhibitions and speaking engagements. His recent drawings of wooden boats in grassy fields reflect both his continued interest in far eastern art and his celebration of renewed personal vitality as a cancer survivor. Dirk Bach lives and works in New York with the artist Kay WalkingStick. Our sincere thanks to darksilenceinsuburbia for this Curator’s Monday.
[more Dirk Bach | Curator’s Monday with darksilenceinsuburbia]
  • Curator’s Monday 148
Dirk Bach (b.1939, USA)
After enrolling in a drawing class, Dirk Bach discovered a strong interest in creating images and decided to pursue studies in the visual arts. He obtained a BFA from University of Denver in 1961 and an MA in painting in 1962. He has served as professor at the University of New Hampshire art department and the Rhode Island School of Design, where he taught drawing, painting, design, printmaking and art and architectural histories of Japan, China, India, and contemporary America. His own studio work focused firstly on landscape mandalas inspired by a National Endowment to the Humanities grant for travel to temples in Nara and Kyoto, Japan, and on Buddhist “Pure Land” diagrams based on imagery in the Lotus Sutra and Heart Sutra. These works led to several exhibitions and speaking engagements. His recent drawings of wooden boats in grassy fields reflect both his continued interest in far eastern art and his celebration of renewed personal vitality as a cancer survivor. Dirk Bach lives and works in New York with the artist Kay WalkingStick. Our sincere thanks to darksilenceinsuburbia for this Curator’s Monday.
[more Dirk Bach | Curator’s Monday with darksilenceinsuburbia]
  • Curator’s Monday 148
Dirk Bach (b.1939, USA)
After enrolling in a drawing class, Dirk Bach discovered a strong interest in creating images and decided to pursue studies in the visual arts. He obtained a BFA from University of Denver in 1961 and an MA in painting in 1962. He has served as professor at the University of New Hampshire art department and the Rhode Island School of Design, where he taught drawing, painting, design, printmaking and art and architectural histories of Japan, China, India, and contemporary America. His own studio work focused firstly on landscape mandalas inspired by a National Endowment to the Humanities grant for travel to temples in Nara and Kyoto, Japan, and on Buddhist “Pure Land” diagrams based on imagery in the Lotus Sutra and Heart Sutra. These works led to several exhibitions and speaking engagements. His recent drawings of wooden boats in grassy fields reflect both his continued interest in far eastern art and his celebration of renewed personal vitality as a cancer survivor. Dirk Bach lives and works in New York with the artist Kay WalkingStick. Our sincere thanks to darksilenceinsuburbia for this Curator’s Monday.
[more Dirk Bach | Curator’s Monday with darksilenceinsuburbia]
  • Curator’s Monday 148
Dirk Bach (b.1939, USA)
After enrolling in a drawing class, Dirk Bach discovered a strong interest in creating images and decided to pursue studies in the visual arts. He obtained a BFA from University of Denver in 1961 and an MA in painting in 1962. He has served as professor at the University of New Hampshire art department and the Rhode Island School of Design, where he taught drawing, painting, design, printmaking and art and architectural histories of Japan, China, India, and contemporary America. His own studio work focused firstly on landscape mandalas inspired by a National Endowment to the Humanities grant for travel to temples in Nara and Kyoto, Japan, and on Buddhist “Pure Land” diagrams based on imagery in the Lotus Sutra and Heart Sutra. These works led to several exhibitions and speaking engagements. His recent drawings of wooden boats in grassy fields reflect both his continued interest in far eastern art and his celebration of renewed personal vitality as a cancer survivor. Dirk Bach lives and works in New York with the artist Kay WalkingStick. Our sincere thanks to darksilenceinsuburbia for this Curator’s Monday.
[more Dirk Bach | Curator’s Monday with darksilenceinsuburbia]
  • Curator’s Monday 148
Dirk Bach (b.1939, USA)
After enrolling in a drawing class, Dirk Bach discovered a strong interest in creating images and decided to pursue studies in the visual arts. He obtained a BFA from University of Denver in 1961 and an MA in painting in 1962. He has served as professor at the University of New Hampshire art department and the Rhode Island School of Design, where he taught drawing, painting, design, printmaking and art and architectural histories of Japan, China, India, and contemporary America. His own studio work focused firstly on landscape mandalas inspired by a National Endowment to the Humanities grant for travel to temples in Nara and Kyoto, Japan, and on Buddhist “Pure Land” diagrams based on imagery in the Lotus Sutra and Heart Sutra. These works led to several exhibitions and speaking engagements. His recent drawings of wooden boats in grassy fields reflect both his continued interest in far eastern art and his celebration of renewed personal vitality as a cancer survivor. Dirk Bach lives and works in New York with the artist Kay WalkingStick. Our sincere thanks to darksilenceinsuburbia for this Curator’s Monday.
[more Dirk Bach | Curator’s Monday with darksilenceinsuburbia]
  • Curator’s Monday 148
Dirk Bach (b.1939, USA)
After enrolling in a drawing class, Dirk Bach discovered a strong interest in creating images and decided to pursue studies in the visual arts. He obtained a BFA from University of Denver in 1961 and an MA in painting in 1962. He has served as professor at the University of New Hampshire art department and the Rhode Island School of Design, where he taught drawing, painting, design, printmaking and art and architectural histories of Japan, China, India, and contemporary America. His own studio work focused firstly on landscape mandalas inspired by a National Endowment to the Humanities grant for travel to temples in Nara and Kyoto, Japan, and on Buddhist “Pure Land” diagrams based on imagery in the Lotus Sutra and Heart Sutra. These works led to several exhibitions and speaking engagements. His recent drawings of wooden boats in grassy fields reflect both his continued interest in far eastern art and his celebration of renewed personal vitality as a cancer survivor. Dirk Bach lives and works in New York with the artist Kay WalkingStick. Our sincere thanks to darksilenceinsuburbia for this Curator’s Monday.
[more Dirk Bach | Curator’s Monday with darksilenceinsuburbia]
  • Curator’s Monday 148
Dirk Bach (b.1939, USA)
After enrolling in a drawing class, Dirk Bach discovered a strong interest in creating images and decided to pursue studies in the visual arts. He obtained a BFA from University of Denver in 1961 and an MA in painting in 1962. He has served as professor at the University of New Hampshire art department and the Rhode Island School of Design, where he taught drawing, painting, design, printmaking and art and architectural histories of Japan, China, India, and contemporary America. His own studio work focused firstly on landscape mandalas inspired by a National Endowment to the Humanities grant for travel to temples in Nara and Kyoto, Japan, and on Buddhist “Pure Land” diagrams based on imagery in the Lotus Sutra and Heart Sutra. These works led to several exhibitions and speaking engagements. His recent drawings of wooden boats in grassy fields reflect both his continued interest in far eastern art and his celebration of renewed personal vitality as a cancer survivor. Dirk Bach lives and works in New York with the artist Kay WalkingStick. Our sincere thanks to darksilenceinsuburbia for this Curator’s Monday.
[more Dirk Bach | Curator’s Monday with darksilenceinsuburbia]
  • Curator’s Monday 148
Dirk Bach (b.1939, USA)
After enrolling in a drawing class, Dirk Bach discovered a strong interest in creating images and decided to pursue studies in the visual arts. He obtained a BFA from University of Denver in 1961 and an MA in painting in 1962. He has served as professor at the University of New Hampshire art department and the Rhode Island School of Design, where he taught drawing, painting, design, printmaking and art and architectural histories of Japan, China, India, and contemporary America. His own studio work focused firstly on landscape mandalas inspired by a National Endowment to the Humanities grant for travel to temples in Nara and Kyoto, Japan, and on Buddhist “Pure Land” diagrams based on imagery in the Lotus Sutra and Heart Sutra. These works led to several exhibitions and speaking engagements. His recent drawings of wooden boats in grassy fields reflect both his continued interest in far eastern art and his celebration of renewed personal vitality as a cancer survivor. Dirk Bach lives and works in New York with the artist Kay WalkingStick. Our sincere thanks to darksilenceinsuburbia for this Curator’s Monday.
[more Dirk Bach | Curator’s Monday with darksilenceinsuburbia]
Curator’s Monday 148
Dirk Bach (b.1939, USA)
After enrolling in a drawing class, Dirk Bach discovered a strong interest in creating images and decided to pursue studies in the visual arts. He obtained a BFA from University of Denver in 1961 and an MA in painting in 1962. He has served as professor at the University of New Hampshire art department and the Rhode Island School of Design, where he taught drawing, painting, design, printmaking and art and architectural histories of Japan, China, India, and contemporary America. His own studio work focused firstly on landscape mandalas inspired by a National Endowment to the Humanities grant for travel to temples in Nara and Kyoto, Japan, and on Buddhist “Pure Land” diagrams based on imagery in the Lotus Sutra and Heart Sutra. These works led to several exhibitions and speaking engagements. His recent drawings of wooden boats in grassy fields reflect both his continued interest in far eastern art and his celebration of renewed personal vitality as a cancer survivor. Dirk Bach lives and works in New York with the artist Kay WalkingStick. Our sincere thanks to darksilenceinsuburbia for this Curator’s Monday.
[more Dirk Bach | Curator’s Monday with darksilenceinsuburbia] Curator’s Monday 148
Dirk Bach (b.1939, USA)
After enrolling in a drawing class, Dirk Bach discovered a strong interest in creating images and decided to pursue studies in the visual arts. He obtained a BFA from University of Denver in 1961 and an MA in painting in 1962. He has served as professor at the University of New Hampshire art department and the Rhode Island School of Design, where he taught drawing, painting, design, printmaking and art and architectural histories of Japan, China, India, and contemporary America. His own studio work focused firstly on landscape mandalas inspired by a National Endowment to the Humanities grant for travel to temples in Nara and Kyoto, Japan, and on Buddhist “Pure Land” diagrams based on imagery in the Lotus Sutra and Heart Sutra. These works led to several exhibitions and speaking engagements. His recent drawings of wooden boats in grassy fields reflect both his continued interest in far eastern art and his celebration of renewed personal vitality as a cancer survivor. Dirk Bach lives and works in New York with the artist Kay WalkingStick. Our sincere thanks to darksilenceinsuburbia for this Curator’s Monday.
[more Dirk Bach | Curator’s Monday with darksilenceinsuburbia] Curator’s Monday 148
Dirk Bach (b.1939, USA)
After enrolling in a drawing class, Dirk Bach discovered a strong interest in creating images and decided to pursue studies in the visual arts. He obtained a BFA from University of Denver in 1961 and an MA in painting in 1962. He has served as professor at the University of New Hampshire art department and the Rhode Island School of Design, where he taught drawing, painting, design, printmaking and art and architectural histories of Japan, China, India, and contemporary America. His own studio work focused firstly on landscape mandalas inspired by a National Endowment to the Humanities grant for travel to temples in Nara and Kyoto, Japan, and on Buddhist “Pure Land” diagrams based on imagery in the Lotus Sutra and Heart Sutra. These works led to several exhibitions and speaking engagements. His recent drawings of wooden boats in grassy fields reflect both his continued interest in far eastern art and his celebration of renewed personal vitality as a cancer survivor. Dirk Bach lives and works in New York with the artist Kay WalkingStick. Our sincere thanks to darksilenceinsuburbia for this Curator’s Monday.
[more Dirk Bach | Curator’s Monday with darksilenceinsuburbia] Curator’s Monday 148
Dirk Bach (b.1939, USA)
After enrolling in a drawing class, Dirk Bach discovered a strong interest in creating images and decided to pursue studies in the visual arts. He obtained a BFA from University of Denver in 1961 and an MA in painting in 1962. He has served as professor at the University of New Hampshire art department and the Rhode Island School of Design, where he taught drawing, painting, design, printmaking and art and architectural histories of Japan, China, India, and contemporary America. His own studio work focused firstly on landscape mandalas inspired by a National Endowment to the Humanities grant for travel to temples in Nara and Kyoto, Japan, and on Buddhist “Pure Land” diagrams based on imagery in the Lotus Sutra and Heart Sutra. These works led to several exhibitions and speaking engagements. His recent drawings of wooden boats in grassy fields reflect both his continued interest in far eastern art and his celebration of renewed personal vitality as a cancer survivor. Dirk Bach lives and works in New York with the artist Kay WalkingStick. Our sincere thanks to darksilenceinsuburbia for this Curator’s Monday.
[more Dirk Bach | Curator’s Monday with darksilenceinsuburbia] Curator’s Monday 148
Dirk Bach (b.1939, USA)
After enrolling in a drawing class, Dirk Bach discovered a strong interest in creating images and decided to pursue studies in the visual arts. He obtained a BFA from University of Denver in 1961 and an MA in painting in 1962. He has served as professor at the University of New Hampshire art department and the Rhode Island School of Design, where he taught drawing, painting, design, printmaking and art and architectural histories of Japan, China, India, and contemporary America. His own studio work focused firstly on landscape mandalas inspired by a National Endowment to the Humanities grant for travel to temples in Nara and Kyoto, Japan, and on Buddhist “Pure Land” diagrams based on imagery in the Lotus Sutra and Heart Sutra. These works led to several exhibitions and speaking engagements. His recent drawings of wooden boats in grassy fields reflect both his continued interest in far eastern art and his celebration of renewed personal vitality as a cancer survivor. Dirk Bach lives and works in New York with the artist Kay WalkingStick. Our sincere thanks to darksilenceinsuburbia for this Curator’s Monday.
[more Dirk Bach | Curator’s Monday with darksilenceinsuburbia]
  • Art Writer’s Wednesday 20 - Artist on Tumblr
Kemi Mai aka drawinds | on Tumblr (UK)
Kemi Mai, aka Drawinds, is a young artist who paints with pixels, using Photoshop and a tablet. Specializing in female portraits, the British artist often sets her subjects against surreal settings, incorporating geometric shapes or nature elements. Artchipel invites Kemi to speak about her personal story, creative process and plans for future projects.
Artchipel: Who is Kemi Mai? Tell us a bit about your educational background.Kemi Mai: I’m Eighteen, I live in the UK, I’m a self-taught artist, and I’ve been painting for almost two years.
A: How has the digital portrait painting initially captured your attention? Do you remember your first piece?KM: All I used to know of digital art was concept art and its place in the gaming and film industries, which was very interesting to me. I don’t think it’s an area that I could ever venture into, but I appreciate it greatly and I suppose it’s perhaps what the digital medium is best known for. I can’t say that I do remember my first piece, but I remember the point when I began to take painting seriously and feel as though there was a need for me to continue creating.
A: How would you describe your work and what do you aim to convey through it? KM: My work starts with an idea derived from thoughts or abstract feelings, which I aim to express in a way that also appeals to me atheistically. Colour has become incredibly important to me, it can be so influential in setting the overall tone of the piece. I like to think of the majority of my paintings as visual representations of things that couldn’t exist organically in real life. Whilst an element of realism is important to me, I haven’t ever been interested in depicting a scene that resembles a photograph without a concept. My work isn’t weighted with messages intended to change the world, but it’s something through which I can be honest, and I appreciate that freedom greatly.
A: Could you share with us your process and how did you come to develop your aesthetic?KM: I begin with an idea, then I usually sketch for around 15-30 minutes. If needed, I’ll clean up my sketch, and then go on to making a palette. From there, I’ll paint in sections, usually starting with my subject’s eyes. I think more recently, within the past few months, I really feel as though I’m beginning to settle into an aesthetic that feels right. I used to feel very weighted by a self-imposed pressure to develop my own personal style, but I think it was only when I stopped focusing on that aspect of my work that things actually began to fall into place.
A: Do you have special rituals to get into creating mood? KM: If I’m feeling inspired, I’ll just get straight into it. If I’m not really quite there yet, I’ll spend some time thinking about painting before actually doing it. I also do most of my work at nighttime and I usually play music or movies whilst I work, but also documentaries. I love nature and science documentaries.
A: If you have any advice for other artists that want to get into digital painting, what would you tell them?KM: Get the right tools, a graphics tablet and Photoshop or Painter are essential. Let go of any expectations about the medium, as what you’ve heard could be incredibly wrong. There’s this huge misconception that digital art is somehow easier or inferior to traditional mediums, but in fact, every medium from watercolour to oil to digital has its own set of pros and cons. When exploring any new medium, I’d say not to be too hard on yourself. There are lots of great tutorials out there on the internet, but the best way to progress is practice, by far.
A: Could you name 3 young artists to keep an eye on?KM: Natalie Foss (on Tumblr), whose understanding of colour is constantly amazing me. Paulette Jo (on Tumblr, see previous posts), I find a sense of escapeism within the detail of her work, which is always a sign of something special. Peony Yip (on Tumblr, see previous posts), whose work is both delicate in its simplicity whilst remaining rich and incredibly engaging.
A: What is your project for the coming year?KM: 2014 came around fast, but at the risk of sounding dangerously cliche, the only project I have planned is growth! Looking back on how my work has progressed through the past year really inspires me to keep working hard. I recently begun working on some commissioned projects, which I’ve already learnt a lot from, so I’m looking forward to any future projects. I also have a plethora of ideas for a personal works which I’m feeling rather apprehensive about, but I think that’s a good sign, and I’m planning to explore some old concepts in new ways.
Thanks Kemi for taking time out to answer these questions. Kemi Mai can be found with updated posts on her Instagram and Tumblr.
[more Kemi Mai aka drawinds | Art Writer’s Wednesday with Artchipel]
  • Art Writer’s Wednesday 20 - Artist on Tumblr
Kemi Mai aka drawinds | on Tumblr (UK)
Kemi Mai, aka Drawinds, is a young artist who paints with pixels, using Photoshop and a tablet. Specializing in female portraits, the British artist often sets her subjects against surreal settings, incorporating geometric shapes or nature elements. Artchipel invites Kemi to speak about her personal story, creative process and plans for future projects.
Artchipel: Who is Kemi Mai? Tell us a bit about your educational background.Kemi Mai: I’m Eighteen, I live in the UK, I’m a self-taught artist, and I’ve been painting for almost two years.
A: How has the digital portrait painting initially captured your attention? Do you remember your first piece?KM: All I used to know of digital art was concept art and its place in the gaming and film industries, which was very interesting to me. I don’t think it’s an area that I could ever venture into, but I appreciate it greatly and I suppose it’s perhaps what the digital medium is best known for. I can’t say that I do remember my first piece, but I remember the point when I began to take painting seriously and feel as though there was a need for me to continue creating.
A: How would you describe your work and what do you aim to convey through it? KM: My work starts with an idea derived from thoughts or abstract feelings, which I aim to express in a way that also appeals to me atheistically. Colour has become incredibly important to me, it can be so influential in setting the overall tone of the piece. I like to think of the majority of my paintings as visual representations of things that couldn’t exist organically in real life. Whilst an element of realism is important to me, I haven’t ever been interested in depicting a scene that resembles a photograph without a concept. My work isn’t weighted with messages intended to change the world, but it’s something through which I can be honest, and I appreciate that freedom greatly.
A: Could you share with us your process and how did you come to develop your aesthetic?KM: I begin with an idea, then I usually sketch for around 15-30 minutes. If needed, I’ll clean up my sketch, and then go on to making a palette. From there, I’ll paint in sections, usually starting with my subject’s eyes. I think more recently, within the past few months, I really feel as though I’m beginning to settle into an aesthetic that feels right. I used to feel very weighted by a self-imposed pressure to develop my own personal style, but I think it was only when I stopped focusing on that aspect of my work that things actually began to fall into place.
A: Do you have special rituals to get into creating mood? KM: If I’m feeling inspired, I’ll just get straight into it. If I’m not really quite there yet, I’ll spend some time thinking about painting before actually doing it. I also do most of my work at nighttime and I usually play music or movies whilst I work, but also documentaries. I love nature and science documentaries.
A: If you have any advice for other artists that want to get into digital painting, what would you tell them?KM: Get the right tools, a graphics tablet and Photoshop or Painter are essential. Let go of any expectations about the medium, as what you’ve heard could be incredibly wrong. There’s this huge misconception that digital art is somehow easier or inferior to traditional mediums, but in fact, every medium from watercolour to oil to digital has its own set of pros and cons. When exploring any new medium, I’d say not to be too hard on yourself. There are lots of great tutorials out there on the internet, but the best way to progress is practice, by far.
A: Could you name 3 young artists to keep an eye on?KM: Natalie Foss (on Tumblr), whose understanding of colour is constantly amazing me. Paulette Jo (on Tumblr, see previous posts), I find a sense of escapeism within the detail of her work, which is always a sign of something special. Peony Yip (on Tumblr, see previous posts), whose work is both delicate in its simplicity whilst remaining rich and incredibly engaging.
A: What is your project for the coming year?KM: 2014 came around fast, but at the risk of sounding dangerously cliche, the only project I have planned is growth! Looking back on how my work has progressed through the past year really inspires me to keep working hard. I recently begun working on some commissioned projects, which I’ve already learnt a lot from, so I’m looking forward to any future projects. I also have a plethora of ideas for a personal works which I’m feeling rather apprehensive about, but I think that’s a good sign, and I’m planning to explore some old concepts in new ways.
Thanks Kemi for taking time out to answer these questions. Kemi Mai can be found with updated posts on her Instagram and Tumblr.
[more Kemi Mai aka drawinds | Art Writer’s Wednesday with Artchipel]
  • Art Writer’s Wednesday 20 - Artist on Tumblr
Kemi Mai aka drawinds | on Tumblr (UK)
Kemi Mai, aka Drawinds, is a young artist who paints with pixels, using Photoshop and a tablet. Specializing in female portraits, the British artist often sets her subjects against surreal settings, incorporating geometric shapes or nature elements. Artchipel invites Kemi to speak about her personal story, creative process and plans for future projects.
Artchipel: Who is Kemi Mai? Tell us a bit about your educational background.Kemi Mai: I’m Eighteen, I live in the UK, I’m a self-taught artist, and I’ve been painting for almost two years.
A: How has the digital portrait painting initially captured your attention? Do you remember your first piece?KM: All I used to know of digital art was concept art and its place in the gaming and film industries, which was very interesting to me. I don’t think it’s an area that I could ever venture into, but I appreciate it greatly and I suppose it’s perhaps what the digital medium is best known for. I can’t say that I do remember my first piece, but I remember the point when I began to take painting seriously and feel as though there was a need for me to continue creating.
A: How would you describe your work and what do you aim to convey through it? KM: My work starts with an idea derived from thoughts or abstract feelings, which I aim to express in a way that also appeals to me atheistically. Colour has become incredibly important to me, it can be so influential in setting the overall tone of the piece. I like to think of the majority of my paintings as visual representations of things that couldn’t exist organically in real life. Whilst an element of realism is important to me, I haven’t ever been interested in depicting a scene that resembles a photograph without a concept. My work isn’t weighted with messages intended to change the world, but it’s something through which I can be honest, and I appreciate that freedom greatly.
A: Could you share with us your process and how did you come to develop your aesthetic?KM: I begin with an idea, then I usually sketch for around 15-30 minutes. If needed, I’ll clean up my sketch, and then go on to making a palette. From there, I’ll paint in sections, usually starting with my subject’s eyes. I think more recently, within the past few months, I really feel as though I’m beginning to settle into an aesthetic that feels right. I used to feel very weighted by a self-imposed pressure to develop my own personal style, but I think it was only when I stopped focusing on that aspect of my work that things actually began to fall into place.
A: Do you have special rituals to get into creating mood? KM: If I’m feeling inspired, I’ll just get straight into it. If I’m not really quite there yet, I’ll spend some time thinking about painting before actually doing it. I also do most of my work at nighttime and I usually play music or movies whilst I work, but also documentaries. I love nature and science documentaries.
A: If you have any advice for other artists that want to get into digital painting, what would you tell them?KM: Get the right tools, a graphics tablet and Photoshop or Painter are essential. Let go of any expectations about the medium, as what you’ve heard could be incredibly wrong. There’s this huge misconception that digital art is somehow easier or inferior to traditional mediums, but in fact, every medium from watercolour to oil to digital has its own set of pros and cons. When exploring any new medium, I’d say not to be too hard on yourself. There are lots of great tutorials out there on the internet, but the best way to progress is practice, by far.
A: Could you name 3 young artists to keep an eye on?KM: Natalie Foss (on Tumblr), whose understanding of colour is constantly amazing me. Paulette Jo (on Tumblr, see previous posts), I find a sense of escapeism within the detail of her work, which is always a sign of something special. Peony Yip (on Tumblr, see previous posts), whose work is both delicate in its simplicity whilst remaining rich and incredibly engaging.
A: What is your project for the coming year?KM: 2014 came around fast, but at the risk of sounding dangerously cliche, the only project I have planned is growth! Looking back on how my work has progressed through the past year really inspires me to keep working hard. I recently begun working on some commissioned projects, which I’ve already learnt a lot from, so I’m looking forward to any future projects. I also have a plethora of ideas for a personal works which I’m feeling rather apprehensive about, but I think that’s a good sign, and I’m planning to explore some old concepts in new ways.
Thanks Kemi for taking time out to answer these questions. Kemi Mai can be found with updated posts on her Instagram and Tumblr.
[more Kemi Mai aka drawinds | Art Writer’s Wednesday with Artchipel]
  • Art Writer’s Wednesday 20 - Artist on Tumblr
Kemi Mai aka drawinds | on Tumblr (UK)
Kemi Mai, aka Drawinds, is a young artist who paints with pixels, using Photoshop and a tablet. Specializing in female portraits, the British artist often sets her subjects against surreal settings, incorporating geometric shapes or nature elements. Artchipel invites Kemi to speak about her personal story, creative process and plans for future projects.
Artchipel: Who is Kemi Mai? Tell us a bit about your educational background.Kemi Mai: I’m Eighteen, I live in the UK, I’m a self-taught artist, and I’ve been painting for almost two years.
A: How has the digital portrait painting initially captured your attention? Do you remember your first piece?KM: All I used to know of digital art was concept art and its place in the gaming and film industries, which was very interesting to me. I don’t think it’s an area that I could ever venture into, but I appreciate it greatly and I suppose it’s perhaps what the digital medium is best known for. I can’t say that I do remember my first piece, but I remember the point when I began to take painting seriously and feel as though there was a need for me to continue creating.
A: How would you describe your work and what do you aim to convey through it? KM: My work starts with an idea derived from thoughts or abstract feelings, which I aim to express in a way that also appeals to me atheistically. Colour has become incredibly important to me, it can be so influential in setting the overall tone of the piece. I like to think of the majority of my paintings as visual representations of things that couldn’t exist organically in real life. Whilst an element of realism is important to me, I haven’t ever been interested in depicting a scene that resembles a photograph without a concept. My work isn’t weighted with messages intended to change the world, but it’s something through which I can be honest, and I appreciate that freedom greatly.
A: Could you share with us your process and how did you come to develop your aesthetic?KM: I begin with an idea, then I usually sketch for around 15-30 minutes. If needed, I’ll clean up my sketch, and then go on to making a palette. From there, I’ll paint in sections, usually starting with my subject’s eyes. I think more recently, within the past few months, I really feel as though I’m beginning to settle into an aesthetic that feels right. I used to feel very weighted by a self-imposed pressure to develop my own personal style, but I think it was only when I stopped focusing on that aspect of my work that things actually began to fall into place.
A: Do you have special rituals to get into creating mood? KM: If I’m feeling inspired, I’ll just get straight into it. If I’m not really quite there yet, I’ll spend some time thinking about painting before actually doing it. I also do most of my work at nighttime and I usually play music or movies whilst I work, but also documentaries. I love nature and science documentaries.
A: If you have any advice for other artists that want to get into digital painting, what would you tell them?KM: Get the right tools, a graphics tablet and Photoshop or Painter are essential. Let go of any expectations about the medium, as what you’ve heard could be incredibly wrong. There’s this huge misconception that digital art is somehow easier or inferior to traditional mediums, but in fact, every medium from watercolour to oil to digital has its own set of pros and cons. When exploring any new medium, I’d say not to be too hard on yourself. There are lots of great tutorials out there on the internet, but the best way to progress is practice, by far.
A: Could you name 3 young artists to keep an eye on?KM: Natalie Foss (on Tumblr), whose understanding of colour is constantly amazing me. Paulette Jo (on Tumblr, see previous posts), I find a sense of escapeism within the detail of her work, which is always a sign of something special. Peony Yip (on Tumblr, see previous posts), whose work is both delicate in its simplicity whilst remaining rich and incredibly engaging.
A: What is your project for the coming year?KM: 2014 came around fast, but at the risk of sounding dangerously cliche, the only project I have planned is growth! Looking back on how my work has progressed through the past year really inspires me to keep working hard. I recently begun working on some commissioned projects, which I’ve already learnt a lot from, so I’m looking forward to any future projects. I also have a plethora of ideas for a personal works which I’m feeling rather apprehensive about, but I think that’s a good sign, and I’m planning to explore some old concepts in new ways.
Thanks Kemi for taking time out to answer these questions. Kemi Mai can be found with updated posts on her Instagram and Tumblr.
[more Kemi Mai aka drawinds | Art Writer’s Wednesday with Artchipel]
  • Art Writer’s Wednesday 20 - Artist on Tumblr
Kemi Mai aka drawinds | on Tumblr (UK)
Kemi Mai, aka Drawinds, is a young artist who paints with pixels, using Photoshop and a tablet. Specializing in female portraits, the British artist often sets her subjects against surreal settings, incorporating geometric shapes or nature elements. Artchipel invites Kemi to speak about her personal story, creative process and plans for future projects.
Artchipel: Who is Kemi Mai? Tell us a bit about your educational background.Kemi Mai: I’m Eighteen, I live in the UK, I’m a self-taught artist, and I’ve been painting for almost two years.
A: How has the digital portrait painting initially captured your attention? Do you remember your first piece?KM: All I used to know of digital art was concept art and its place in the gaming and film industries, which was very interesting to me. I don’t think it’s an area that I could ever venture into, but I appreciate it greatly and I suppose it’s perhaps what the digital medium is best known for. I can’t say that I do remember my first piece, but I remember the point when I began to take painting seriously and feel as though there was a need for me to continue creating.
A: How would you describe your work and what do you aim to convey through it? KM: My work starts with an idea derived from thoughts or abstract feelings, which I aim to express in a way that also appeals to me atheistically. Colour has become incredibly important to me, it can be so influential in setting the overall tone of the piece. I like to think of the majority of my paintings as visual representations of things that couldn’t exist organically in real life. Whilst an element of realism is important to me, I haven’t ever been interested in depicting a scene that resembles a photograph without a concept. My work isn’t weighted with messages intended to change the world, but it’s something through which I can be honest, and I appreciate that freedom greatly.
A: Could you share with us your process and how did you come to develop your aesthetic?KM: I begin with an idea, then I usually sketch for around 15-30 minutes. If needed, I’ll clean up my sketch, and then go on to making a palette. From there, I’ll paint in sections, usually starting with my subject’s eyes. I think more recently, within the past few months, I really feel as though I’m beginning to settle into an aesthetic that feels right. I used to feel very weighted by a self-imposed pressure to develop my own personal style, but I think it was only when I stopped focusing on that aspect of my work that things actually began to fall into place.
A: Do you have special rituals to get into creating mood? KM: If I’m feeling inspired, I’ll just get straight into it. If I’m not really quite there yet, I’ll spend some time thinking about painting before actually doing it. I also do most of my work at nighttime and I usually play music or movies whilst I work, but also documentaries. I love nature and science documentaries.
A: If you have any advice for other artists that want to get into digital painting, what would you tell them?KM: Get the right tools, a graphics tablet and Photoshop or Painter are essential. Let go of any expectations about the medium, as what you’ve heard could be incredibly wrong. There’s this huge misconception that digital art is somehow easier or inferior to traditional mediums, but in fact, every medium from watercolour to oil to digital has its own set of pros and cons. When exploring any new medium, I’d say not to be too hard on yourself. There are lots of great tutorials out there on the internet, but the best way to progress is practice, by far.
A: Could you name 3 young artists to keep an eye on?KM: Natalie Foss (on Tumblr), whose understanding of colour is constantly amazing me. Paulette Jo (on Tumblr, see previous posts), I find a sense of escapeism within the detail of her work, which is always a sign of something special. Peony Yip (on Tumblr, see previous posts), whose work is both delicate in its simplicity whilst remaining rich and incredibly engaging.
A: What is your project for the coming year?KM: 2014 came around fast, but at the risk of sounding dangerously cliche, the only project I have planned is growth! Looking back on how my work has progressed through the past year really inspires me to keep working hard. I recently begun working on some commissioned projects, which I’ve already learnt a lot from, so I’m looking forward to any future projects. I also have a plethora of ideas for a personal works which I’m feeling rather apprehensive about, but I think that’s a good sign, and I’m planning to explore some old concepts in new ways.
Thanks Kemi for taking time out to answer these questions. Kemi Mai can be found with updated posts on her Instagram and Tumblr.
[more Kemi Mai aka drawinds | Art Writer’s Wednesday with Artchipel]
  • Art Writer’s Wednesday 20 - Artist on Tumblr
Kemi Mai aka drawinds | on Tumblr (UK)
Kemi Mai, aka Drawinds, is a young artist who paints with pixels, using Photoshop and a tablet. Specializing in female portraits, the British artist often sets her subjects against surreal settings, incorporating geometric shapes or nature elements. Artchipel invites Kemi to speak about her personal story, creative process and plans for future projects.
Artchipel: Who is Kemi Mai? Tell us a bit about your educational background.Kemi Mai: I’m Eighteen, I live in the UK, I’m a self-taught artist, and I’ve been painting for almost two years.
A: How has the digital portrait painting initially captured your attention? Do you remember your first piece?KM: All I used to know of digital art was concept art and its place in the gaming and film industries, which was very interesting to me. I don’t think it’s an area that I could ever venture into, but I appreciate it greatly and I suppose it’s perhaps what the digital medium is best known for. I can’t say that I do remember my first piece, but I remember the point when I began to take painting seriously and feel as though there was a need for me to continue creating.
A: How would you describe your work and what do you aim to convey through it? KM: My work starts with an idea derived from thoughts or abstract feelings, which I aim to express in a way that also appeals to me atheistically. Colour has become incredibly important to me, it can be so influential in setting the overall tone of the piece. I like to think of the majority of my paintings as visual representations of things that couldn’t exist organically in real life. Whilst an element of realism is important to me, I haven’t ever been interested in depicting a scene that resembles a photograph without a concept. My work isn’t weighted with messages intended to change the world, but it’s something through which I can be honest, and I appreciate that freedom greatly.
A: Could you share with us your process and how did you come to develop your aesthetic?KM: I begin with an idea, then I usually sketch for around 15-30 minutes. If needed, I’ll clean up my sketch, and then go on to making a palette. From there, I’ll paint in sections, usually starting with my subject’s eyes. I think more recently, within the past few months, I really feel as though I’m beginning to settle into an aesthetic that feels right. I used to feel very weighted by a self-imposed pressure to develop my own personal style, but I think it was only when I stopped focusing on that aspect of my work that things actually began to fall into place.
A: Do you have special rituals to get into creating mood? KM: If I’m feeling inspired, I’ll just get straight into it. If I’m not really quite there yet, I’ll spend some time thinking about painting before actually doing it. I also do most of my work at nighttime and I usually play music or movies whilst I work, but also documentaries. I love nature and science documentaries.
A: If you have any advice for other artists that want to get into digital painting, what would you tell them?KM: Get the right tools, a graphics tablet and Photoshop or Painter are essential. Let go of any expectations about the medium, as what you’ve heard could be incredibly wrong. There’s this huge misconception that digital art is somehow easier or inferior to traditional mediums, but in fact, every medium from watercolour to oil to digital has its own set of pros and cons. When exploring any new medium, I’d say not to be too hard on yourself. There are lots of great tutorials out there on the internet, but the best way to progress is practice, by far.
A: Could you name 3 young artists to keep an eye on?KM: Natalie Foss (on Tumblr), whose understanding of colour is constantly amazing me. Paulette Jo (on Tumblr, see previous posts), I find a sense of escapeism within the detail of her work, which is always a sign of something special. Peony Yip (on Tumblr, see previous posts), whose work is both delicate in its simplicity whilst remaining rich and incredibly engaging.
A: What is your project for the coming year?KM: 2014 came around fast, but at the risk of sounding dangerously cliche, the only project I have planned is growth! Looking back on how my work has progressed through the past year really inspires me to keep working hard. I recently begun working on some commissioned projects, which I’ve already learnt a lot from, so I’m looking forward to any future projects. I also have a plethora of ideas for a personal works which I’m feeling rather apprehensive about, but I think that’s a good sign, and I’m planning to explore some old concepts in new ways.
Thanks Kemi for taking time out to answer these questions. Kemi Mai can be found with updated posts on her Instagram and Tumblr.
[more Kemi Mai aka drawinds | Art Writer’s Wednesday with Artchipel]
  • Art Writer’s Wednesday 20 - Artist on Tumblr
Kemi Mai aka drawinds | on Tumblr (UK)
Kemi Mai, aka Drawinds, is a young artist who paints with pixels, using Photoshop and a tablet. Specializing in female portraits, the British artist often sets her subjects against surreal settings, incorporating geometric shapes or nature elements. Artchipel invites Kemi to speak about her personal story, creative process and plans for future projects.
Artchipel: Who is Kemi Mai? Tell us a bit about your educational background.Kemi Mai: I’m Eighteen, I live in the UK, I’m a self-taught artist, and I’ve been painting for almost two years.
A: How has the digital portrait painting initially captured your attention? Do you remember your first piece?KM: All I used to know of digital art was concept art and its place in the gaming and film industries, which was very interesting to me. I don’t think it’s an area that I could ever venture into, but I appreciate it greatly and I suppose it’s perhaps what the digital medium is best known for. I can’t say that I do remember my first piece, but I remember the point when I began to take painting seriously and feel as though there was a need for me to continue creating.
A: How would you describe your work and what do you aim to convey through it? KM: My work starts with an idea derived from thoughts or abstract feelings, which I aim to express in a way that also appeals to me atheistically. Colour has become incredibly important to me, it can be so influential in setting the overall tone of the piece. I like to think of the majority of my paintings as visual representations of things that couldn’t exist organically in real life. Whilst an element of realism is important to me, I haven’t ever been interested in depicting a scene that resembles a photograph without a concept. My work isn’t weighted with messages intended to change the world, but it’s something through which I can be honest, and I appreciate that freedom greatly.
A: Could you share with us your process and how did you come to develop your aesthetic?KM: I begin with an idea, then I usually sketch for around 15-30 minutes. If needed, I’ll clean up my sketch, and then go on to making a palette. From there, I’ll paint in sections, usually starting with my subject’s eyes. I think more recently, within the past few months, I really feel as though I’m beginning to settle into an aesthetic that feels right. I used to feel very weighted by a self-imposed pressure to develop my own personal style, but I think it was only when I stopped focusing on that aspect of my work that things actually began to fall into place.
A: Do you have special rituals to get into creating mood? KM: If I’m feeling inspired, I’ll just get straight into it. If I’m not really quite there yet, I’ll spend some time thinking about painting before actually doing it. I also do most of my work at nighttime and I usually play music or movies whilst I work, but also documentaries. I love nature and science documentaries.
A: If you have any advice for other artists that want to get into digital painting, what would you tell them?KM: Get the right tools, a graphics tablet and Photoshop or Painter are essential. Let go of any expectations about the medium, as what you’ve heard could be incredibly wrong. There’s this huge misconception that digital art is somehow easier or inferior to traditional mediums, but in fact, every medium from watercolour to oil to digital has its own set of pros and cons. When exploring any new medium, I’d say not to be too hard on yourself. There are lots of great tutorials out there on the internet, but the best way to progress is practice, by far.
A: Could you name 3 young artists to keep an eye on?KM: Natalie Foss (on Tumblr), whose understanding of colour is constantly amazing me. Paulette Jo (on Tumblr, see previous posts), I find a sense of escapeism within the detail of her work, which is always a sign of something special. Peony Yip (on Tumblr, see previous posts), whose work is both delicate in its simplicity whilst remaining rich and incredibly engaging.
A: What is your project for the coming year?KM: 2014 came around fast, but at the risk of sounding dangerously cliche, the only project I have planned is growth! Looking back on how my work has progressed through the past year really inspires me to keep working hard. I recently begun working on some commissioned projects, which I’ve already learnt a lot from, so I’m looking forward to any future projects. I also have a plethora of ideas for a personal works which I’m feeling rather apprehensive about, but I think that’s a good sign, and I’m planning to explore some old concepts in new ways.
Thanks Kemi for taking time out to answer these questions. Kemi Mai can be found with updated posts on her Instagram and Tumblr.
[more Kemi Mai aka drawinds | Art Writer’s Wednesday with Artchipel]
  • Art Writer’s Wednesday 20 - Artist on Tumblr
Kemi Mai aka drawinds | on Tumblr (UK)
Kemi Mai, aka Drawinds, is a young artist who paints with pixels, using Photoshop and a tablet. Specializing in female portraits, the British artist often sets her subjects against surreal settings, incorporating geometric shapes or nature elements. Artchipel invites Kemi to speak about her personal story, creative process and plans for future projects.
Artchipel: Who is Kemi Mai? Tell us a bit about your educational background.Kemi Mai: I’m Eighteen, I live in the UK, I’m a self-taught artist, and I’ve been painting for almost two years.
A: How has the digital portrait painting initially captured your attention? Do you remember your first piece?KM: All I used to know of digital art was concept art and its place in the gaming and film industries, which was very interesting to me. I don’t think it’s an area that I could ever venture into, but I appreciate it greatly and I suppose it’s perhaps what the digital medium is best known for. I can’t say that I do remember my first piece, but I remember the point when I began to take painting seriously and feel as though there was a need for me to continue creating.
A: How would you describe your work and what do you aim to convey through it? KM: My work starts with an idea derived from thoughts or abstract feelings, which I aim to express in a way that also appeals to me atheistically. Colour has become incredibly important to me, it can be so influential in setting the overall tone of the piece. I like to think of the majority of my paintings as visual representations of things that couldn’t exist organically in real life. Whilst an element of realism is important to me, I haven’t ever been interested in depicting a scene that resembles a photograph without a concept. My work isn’t weighted with messages intended to change the world, but it’s something through which I can be honest, and I appreciate that freedom greatly.
A: Could you share with us your process and how did you come to develop your aesthetic?KM: I begin with an idea, then I usually sketch for around 15-30 minutes. If needed, I’ll clean up my sketch, and then go on to making a palette. From there, I’ll paint in sections, usually starting with my subject’s eyes. I think more recently, within the past few months, I really feel as though I’m beginning to settle into an aesthetic that feels right. I used to feel very weighted by a self-imposed pressure to develop my own personal style, but I think it was only when I stopped focusing on that aspect of my work that things actually began to fall into place.
A: Do you have special rituals to get into creating mood? KM: If I’m feeling inspired, I’ll just get straight into it. If I’m not really quite there yet, I’ll spend some time thinking about painting before actually doing it. I also do most of my work at nighttime and I usually play music or movies whilst I work, but also documentaries. I love nature and science documentaries.
A: If you have any advice for other artists that want to get into digital painting, what would you tell them?KM: Get the right tools, a graphics tablet and Photoshop or Painter are essential. Let go of any expectations about the medium, as what you’ve heard could be incredibly wrong. There’s this huge misconception that digital art is somehow easier or inferior to traditional mediums, but in fact, every medium from watercolour to oil to digital has its own set of pros and cons. When exploring any new medium, I’d say not to be too hard on yourself. There are lots of great tutorials out there on the internet, but the best way to progress is practice, by far.
A: Could you name 3 young artists to keep an eye on?KM: Natalie Foss (on Tumblr), whose understanding of colour is constantly amazing me. Paulette Jo (on Tumblr, see previous posts), I find a sense of escapeism within the detail of her work, which is always a sign of something special. Peony Yip (on Tumblr, see previous posts), whose work is both delicate in its simplicity whilst remaining rich and incredibly engaging.
A: What is your project for the coming year?KM: 2014 came around fast, but at the risk of sounding dangerously cliche, the only project I have planned is growth! Looking back on how my work has progressed through the past year really inspires me to keep working hard. I recently begun working on some commissioned projects, which I’ve already learnt a lot from, so I’m looking forward to any future projects. I also have a plethora of ideas for a personal works which I’m feeling rather apprehensive about, but I think that’s a good sign, and I’m planning to explore some old concepts in new ways.
Thanks Kemi for taking time out to answer these questions. Kemi Mai can be found with updated posts on her Instagram and Tumblr.
[more Kemi Mai aka drawinds | Art Writer’s Wednesday with Artchipel]
  • Art Writer’s Wednesday 20 - Artist on Tumblr
Kemi Mai aka drawinds | on Tumblr (UK)
Kemi Mai, aka Drawinds, is a young artist who paints with pixels, using Photoshop and a tablet. Specializing in female portraits, the British artist often sets her subjects against surreal settings, incorporating geometric shapes or nature elements. Artchipel invites Kemi to speak about her personal story, creative process and plans for future projects.
Artchipel: Who is Kemi Mai? Tell us a bit about your educational background.Kemi Mai: I’m Eighteen, I live in the UK, I’m a self-taught artist, and I’ve been painting for almost two years.
A: How has the digital portrait painting initially captured your attention? Do you remember your first piece?KM: All I used to know of digital art was concept art and its place in the gaming and film industries, which was very interesting to me. I don’t think it’s an area that I could ever venture into, but I appreciate it greatly and I suppose it’s perhaps what the digital medium is best known for. I can’t say that I do remember my first piece, but I remember the point when I began to take painting seriously and feel as though there was a need for me to continue creating.
A: How would you describe your work and what do you aim to convey through it? KM: My work starts with an idea derived from thoughts or abstract feelings, which I aim to express in a way that also appeals to me atheistically. Colour has become incredibly important to me, it can be so influential in setting the overall tone of the piece. I like to think of the majority of my paintings as visual representations of things that couldn’t exist organically in real life. Whilst an element of realism is important to me, I haven’t ever been interested in depicting a scene that resembles a photograph without a concept. My work isn’t weighted with messages intended to change the world, but it’s something through which I can be honest, and I appreciate that freedom greatly.
A: Could you share with us your process and how did you come to develop your aesthetic?KM: I begin with an idea, then I usually sketch for around 15-30 minutes. If needed, I’ll clean up my sketch, and then go on to making a palette. From there, I’ll paint in sections, usually starting with my subject’s eyes. I think more recently, within the past few months, I really feel as though I’m beginning to settle into an aesthetic that feels right. I used to feel very weighted by a self-imposed pressure to develop my own personal style, but I think it was only when I stopped focusing on that aspect of my work that things actually began to fall into place.
A: Do you have special rituals to get into creating mood? KM: If I’m feeling inspired, I’ll just get straight into it. If I’m not really quite there yet, I’ll spend some time thinking about painting before actually doing it. I also do most of my work at nighttime and I usually play music or movies whilst I work, but also documentaries. I love nature and science documentaries.
A: If you have any advice for other artists that want to get into digital painting, what would you tell them?KM: Get the right tools, a graphics tablet and Photoshop or Painter are essential. Let go of any expectations about the medium, as what you’ve heard could be incredibly wrong. There’s this huge misconception that digital art is somehow easier or inferior to traditional mediums, but in fact, every medium from watercolour to oil to digital has its own set of pros and cons. When exploring any new medium, I’d say not to be too hard on yourself. There are lots of great tutorials out there on the internet, but the best way to progress is practice, by far.
A: Could you name 3 young artists to keep an eye on?KM: Natalie Foss (on Tumblr), whose understanding of colour is constantly amazing me. Paulette Jo (on Tumblr, see previous posts), I find a sense of escapeism within the detail of her work, which is always a sign of something special. Peony Yip (on Tumblr, see previous posts), whose work is both delicate in its simplicity whilst remaining rich and incredibly engaging.
A: What is your project for the coming year?KM: 2014 came around fast, but at the risk of sounding dangerously cliche, the only project I have planned is growth! Looking back on how my work has progressed through the past year really inspires me to keep working hard. I recently begun working on some commissioned projects, which I’ve already learnt a lot from, so I’m looking forward to any future projects. I also have a plethora of ideas for a personal works which I’m feeling rather apprehensive about, but I think that’s a good sign, and I’m planning to explore some old concepts in new ways.
Thanks Kemi for taking time out to answer these questions. Kemi Mai can be found with updated posts on her Instagram and Tumblr.
[more Kemi Mai aka drawinds | Art Writer’s Wednesday with Artchipel]
  • Art Writer’s Wednesday 20 - Artist on Tumblr
Kemi Mai aka drawinds | on Tumblr (UK)
Kemi Mai, aka Drawinds, is a young artist who paints with pixels, using Photoshop and a tablet. Specializing in female portraits, the British artist often sets her subjects against surreal settings, incorporating geometric shapes or nature elements. Artchipel invites Kemi to speak about her personal story, creative process and plans for future projects.
Artchipel: Who is Kemi Mai? Tell us a bit about your educational background.Kemi Mai: I’m Eighteen, I live in the UK, I’m a self-taught artist, and I’ve been painting for almost two years.
A: How has the digital portrait painting initially captured your attention? Do you remember your first piece?KM: All I used to know of digital art was concept art and its place in the gaming and film industries, which was very interesting to me. I don’t think it’s an area that I could ever venture into, but I appreciate it greatly and I suppose it’s perhaps what the digital medium is best known for. I can’t say that I do remember my first piece, but I remember the point when I began to take painting seriously and feel as though there was a need for me to continue creating.
A: How would you describe your work and what do you aim to convey through it? KM: My work starts with an idea derived from thoughts or abstract feelings, which I aim to express in a way that also appeals to me atheistically. Colour has become incredibly important to me, it can be so influential in setting the overall tone of the piece. I like to think of the majority of my paintings as visual representations of things that couldn’t exist organically in real life. Whilst an element of realism is important to me, I haven’t ever been interested in depicting a scene that resembles a photograph without a concept. My work isn’t weighted with messages intended to change the world, but it’s something through which I can be honest, and I appreciate that freedom greatly.
A: Could you share with us your process and how did you come to develop your aesthetic?KM: I begin with an idea, then I usually sketch for around 15-30 minutes. If needed, I’ll clean up my sketch, and then go on to making a palette. From there, I’ll paint in sections, usually starting with my subject’s eyes. I think more recently, within the past few months, I really feel as though I’m beginning to settle into an aesthetic that feels right. I used to feel very weighted by a self-imposed pressure to develop my own personal style, but I think it was only when I stopped focusing on that aspect of my work that things actually began to fall into place.
A: Do you have special rituals to get into creating mood? KM: If I’m feeling inspired, I’ll just get straight into it. If I’m not really quite there yet, I’ll spend some time thinking about painting before actually doing it. I also do most of my work at nighttime and I usually play music or movies whilst I work, but also documentaries. I love nature and science documentaries.
A: If you have any advice for other artists that want to get into digital painting, what would you tell them?KM: Get the right tools, a graphics tablet and Photoshop or Painter are essential. Let go of any expectations about the medium, as what you’ve heard could be incredibly wrong. There’s this huge misconception that digital art is somehow easier or inferior to traditional mediums, but in fact, every medium from watercolour to oil to digital has its own set of pros and cons. When exploring any new medium, I’d say not to be too hard on yourself. There are lots of great tutorials out there on the internet, but the best way to progress is practice, by far.
A: Could you name 3 young artists to keep an eye on?KM: Natalie Foss (on Tumblr), whose understanding of colour is constantly amazing me. Paulette Jo (on Tumblr, see previous posts), I find a sense of escapeism within the detail of her work, which is always a sign of something special. Peony Yip (on Tumblr, see previous posts), whose work is both delicate in its simplicity whilst remaining rich and incredibly engaging.
A: What is your project for the coming year?KM: 2014 came around fast, but at the risk of sounding dangerously cliche, the only project I have planned is growth! Looking back on how my work has progressed through the past year really inspires me to keep working hard. I recently begun working on some commissioned projects, which I’ve already learnt a lot from, so I’m looking forward to any future projects. I also have a plethora of ideas for a personal works which I’m feeling rather apprehensive about, but I think that’s a good sign, and I’m planning to explore some old concepts in new ways.
Thanks Kemi for taking time out to answer these questions. Kemi Mai can be found with updated posts on her Instagram and Tumblr.
[more Kemi Mai aka drawinds | Art Writer’s Wednesday with Artchipel]
Art Writer’s Wednesday 20 - Artist on Tumblr
Kemi Mai aka drawinds | on Tumblr (UK)
Kemi Mai, aka Drawinds, is a young artist who paints with pixels, using Photoshop and a tablet. Specializing in female portraits, the British artist often sets her subjects against surreal settings, incorporating geometric shapes or nature elements. Artchipel invites Kemi to speak about her personal story, creative process and plans for future projects.
Artchipel: Who is Kemi Mai? Tell us a bit about your educational background.Kemi Mai: I’m Eighteen, I live in the UK, I’m a self-taught artist, and I’ve been painting for almost two years.
A: How has the digital portrait painting initially captured your attention? Do you remember your first piece?KM: All I used to know of digital art was concept art and its place in the gaming and film industries, which was very interesting to me. I don’t think it’s an area that I could ever venture into, but I appreciate it greatly and I suppose it’s perhaps what the digital medium is best known for. I can’t say that I do remember my first piece, but I remember the point when I began to take painting seriously and feel as though there was a need for me to continue creating.
A: How would you describe your work and what do you aim to convey through it? KM: My work starts with an idea derived from thoughts or abstract feelings, which I aim to express in a way that also appeals to me atheistically. Colour has become incredibly important to me, it can be so influential in setting the overall tone of the piece. I like to think of the majority of my paintings as visual representations of things that couldn’t exist organically in real life. Whilst an element of realism is important to me, I haven’t ever been interested in depicting a scene that resembles a photograph without a concept. My work isn’t weighted with messages intended to change the world, but it’s something through which I can be honest, and I appreciate that freedom greatly.
A: Could you share with us your process and how did you come to develop your aesthetic?KM: I begin with an idea, then I usually sketch for around 15-30 minutes. If needed, I’ll clean up my sketch, and then go on to making a palette. From there, I’ll paint in sections, usually starting with my subject’s eyes. I think more recently, within the past few months, I really feel as though I’m beginning to settle into an aesthetic that feels right. I used to feel very weighted by a self-imposed pressure to develop my own personal style, but I think it was only when I stopped focusing on that aspect of my work that things actually began to fall into place.
A: Do you have special rituals to get into creating mood? KM: If I’m feeling inspired, I’ll just get straight into it. If I’m not really quite there yet, I’ll spend some time thinking about painting before actually doing it. I also do most of my work at nighttime and I usually play music or movies whilst I work, but also documentaries. I love nature and science documentaries.
A: If you have any advice for other artists that want to get into digital painting, what would you tell them?KM: Get the right tools, a graphics tablet and Photoshop or Painter are essential. Let go of any expectations about the medium, as what you’ve heard could be incredibly wrong. There’s this huge misconception that digital art is somehow easier or inferior to traditional mediums, but in fact, every medium from watercolour to oil to digital has its own set of pros and cons. When exploring any new medium, I’d say not to be too hard on yourself. There are lots of great tutorials out there on the internet, but the best way to progress is practice, by far.
A: Could you name 3 young artists to keep an eye on?KM: Natalie Foss (on Tumblr), whose understanding of colour is constantly amazing me. Paulette Jo (on Tumblr, see previous posts), I find a sense of escapeism within the detail of her work, which is always a sign of something special. Peony Yip (on Tumblr, see previous posts), whose work is both delicate in its simplicity whilst remaining rich and incredibly engaging.
A: What is your project for the coming year?KM: 2014 came around fast, but at the risk of sounding dangerously cliche, the only project I have planned is growth! Looking back on how my work has progressed through the past year really inspires me to keep working hard. I recently begun working on some commissioned projects, which I’ve already learnt a lot from, so I’m looking forward to any future projects. I also have a plethora of ideas for a personal works which I’m feeling rather apprehensive about, but I think that’s a good sign, and I’m planning to explore some old concepts in new ways.
Thanks Kemi for taking time out to answer these questions. Kemi Mai can be found with updated posts on her Instagram and Tumblr.
[more Kemi Mai aka drawinds | Art Writer’s Wednesday with Artchipel] Art Writer’s Wednesday 20 - Artist on Tumblr
Kemi Mai aka drawinds | on Tumblr (UK)
Kemi Mai, aka Drawinds, is a young artist who paints with pixels, using Photoshop and a tablet. Specializing in female portraits, the British artist often sets her subjects against surreal settings, incorporating geometric shapes or nature elements. Artchipel invites Kemi to speak about her personal story, creative process and plans for future projects.
Artchipel: Who is Kemi Mai? Tell us a bit about your educational background.Kemi Mai: I’m Eighteen, I live in the UK, I’m a self-taught artist, and I’ve been painting for almost two years.
A: How has the digital portrait painting initially captured your attention? Do you remember your first piece?KM: All I used to know of digital art was concept art and its place in the gaming and film industries, which was very interesting to me. I don’t think it’s an area that I could ever venture into, but I appreciate it greatly and I suppose it’s perhaps what the digital medium is best known for. I can’t say that I do remember my first piece, but I remember the point when I began to take painting seriously and feel as though there was a need for me to continue creating.
A: How would you describe your work and what do you aim to convey through it? KM: My work starts with an idea derived from thoughts or abstract feelings, which I aim to express in a way that also appeals to me atheistically. Colour has become incredibly important to me, it can be so influential in setting the overall tone of the piece. I like to think of the majority of my paintings as visual representations of things that couldn’t exist organically in real life. Whilst an element of realism is important to me, I haven’t ever been interested in depicting a scene that resembles a photograph without a concept. My work isn’t weighted with messages intended to change the world, but it’s something through which I can be honest, and I appreciate that freedom greatly.
A: Could you share with us your process and how did you come to develop your aesthetic?KM: I begin with an idea, then I usually sketch for around 15-30 minutes. If needed, I’ll clean up my sketch, and then go on to making a palette. From there, I’ll paint in sections, usually starting with my subject’s eyes. I think more recently, within the past few months, I really feel as though I’m beginning to settle into an aesthetic that feels right. I used to feel very weighted by a self-imposed pressure to develop my own personal style, but I think it was only when I stopped focusing on that aspect of my work that things actually began to fall into place.
A: Do you have special rituals to get into creating mood? KM: If I’m feeling inspired, I’ll just get straight into it. If I’m not really quite there yet, I’ll spend some time thinking about painting before actually doing it. I also do most of my work at nighttime and I usually play music or movies whilst I work, but also documentaries. I love nature and science documentaries.
A: If you have any advice for other artists that want to get into digital painting, what would you tell them?KM: Get the right tools, a graphics tablet and Photoshop or Painter are essential. Let go of any expectations about the medium, as what you’ve heard could be incredibly wrong. There’s this huge misconception that digital art is somehow easier or inferior to traditional mediums, but in fact, every medium from watercolour to oil to digital has its own set of pros and cons. When exploring any new medium, I’d say not to be too hard on yourself. There are lots of great tutorials out there on the internet, but the best way to progress is practice, by far.
A: Could you name 3 young artists to keep an eye on?KM: Natalie Foss (on Tumblr), whose understanding of colour is constantly amazing me. Paulette Jo (on Tumblr, see previous posts), I find a sense of escapeism within the detail of her work, which is always a sign of something special. Peony Yip (on Tumblr, see previous posts), whose work is both delicate in its simplicity whilst remaining rich and incredibly engaging.
A: What is your project for the coming year?KM: 2014 came around fast, but at the risk of sounding dangerously cliche, the only project I have planned is growth! Looking back on how my work has progressed through the past year really inspires me to keep working hard. I recently begun working on some commissioned projects, which I’ve already learnt a lot from, so I’m looking forward to any future projects. I also have a plethora of ideas for a personal works which I’m feeling rather apprehensive about, but I think that’s a good sign, and I’m planning to explore some old concepts in new ways.
Thanks Kemi for taking time out to answer these questions. Kemi Mai can be found with updated posts on her Instagram and Tumblr.
[more Kemi Mai aka drawinds | Art Writer’s Wednesday with Artchipel] Art Writer’s Wednesday 20 - Artist on Tumblr
Kemi Mai aka drawinds | on Tumblr (UK)
Kemi Mai, aka Drawinds, is a young artist who paints with pixels, using Photoshop and a tablet. Specializing in female portraits, the British artist often sets her subjects against surreal settings, incorporating geometric shapes or nature elements. Artchipel invites Kemi to speak about her personal story, creative process and plans for future projects.
Artchipel: Who is Kemi Mai? Tell us a bit about your educational background.Kemi Mai: I’m Eighteen, I live in the UK, I’m a self-taught artist, and I’ve been painting for almost two years.
A: How has the digital portrait painting initially captured your attention? Do you remember your first piece?KM: All I used to know of digital art was concept art and its place in the gaming and film industries, which was very interesting to me. I don’t think it’s an area that I could ever venture into, but I appreciate it greatly and I suppose it’s perhaps what the digital medium is best known for. I can’t say that I do remember my first piece, but I remember the point when I began to take painting seriously and feel as though there was a need for me to continue creating.
A: How would you describe your work and what do you aim to convey through it? KM: My work starts with an idea derived from thoughts or abstract feelings, which I aim to express in a way that also appeals to me atheistically. Colour has become incredibly important to me, it can be so influential in setting the overall tone of the piece. I like to think of the majority of my paintings as visual representations of things that couldn’t exist organically in real life. Whilst an element of realism is important to me, I haven’t ever been interested in depicting a scene that resembles a photograph without a concept. My work isn’t weighted with messages intended to change the world, but it’s something through which I can be honest, and I appreciate that freedom greatly.
A: Could you share with us your process and how did you come to develop your aesthetic?KM: I begin with an idea, then I usually sketch for around 15-30 minutes. If needed, I’ll clean up my sketch, and then go on to making a palette. From there, I’ll paint in sections, usually starting with my subject’s eyes. I think more recently, within the past few months, I really feel as though I’m beginning to settle into an aesthetic that feels right. I used to feel very weighted by a self-imposed pressure to develop my own personal style, but I think it was only when I stopped focusing on that aspect of my work that things actually began to fall into place.
A: Do you have special rituals to get into creating mood? KM: If I’m feeling inspired, I’ll just get straight into it. If I’m not really quite there yet, I’ll spend some time thinking about painting before actually doing it. I also do most of my work at nighttime and I usually play music or movies whilst I work, but also documentaries. I love nature and science documentaries.
A: If you have any advice for other artists that want to get into digital painting, what would you tell them?KM: Get the right tools, a graphics tablet and Photoshop or Painter are essential. Let go of any expectations about the medium, as what you’ve heard could be incredibly wrong. There’s this huge misconception that digital art is somehow easier or inferior to traditional mediums, but in fact, every medium from watercolour to oil to digital has its own set of pros and cons. When exploring any new medium, I’d say not to be too hard on yourself. There are lots of great tutorials out there on the internet, but the best way to progress is practice, by far.
A: Could you name 3 young artists to keep an eye on?KM: Natalie Foss (on Tumblr), whose understanding of colour is constantly amazing me. Paulette Jo (on Tumblr, see previous posts), I find a sense of escapeism within the detail of her work, which is always a sign of something special. Peony Yip (on Tumblr, see previous posts), whose work is both delicate in its simplicity whilst remaining rich and incredibly engaging.
A: What is your project for the coming year?KM: 2014 came around fast, but at the risk of sounding dangerously cliche, the only project I have planned is growth! Looking back on how my work has progressed through the past year really inspires me to keep working hard. I recently begun working on some commissioned projects, which I’ve already learnt a lot from, so I’m looking forward to any future projects. I also have a plethora of ideas for a personal works which I’m feeling rather apprehensive about, but I think that’s a good sign, and I’m planning to explore some old concepts in new ways.
Thanks Kemi for taking time out to answer these questions. Kemi Mai can be found with updated posts on her Instagram and Tumblr.
[more Kemi Mai aka drawinds | Art Writer’s Wednesday with Artchipel] Art Writer’s Wednesday 20 - Artist on Tumblr
Kemi Mai aka drawinds | on Tumblr (UK)
Kemi Mai, aka Drawinds, is a young artist who paints with pixels, using Photoshop and a tablet. Specializing in female portraits, the British artist often sets her subjects against surreal settings, incorporating geometric shapes or nature elements. Artchipel invites Kemi to speak about her personal story, creative process and plans for future projects.
Artchipel: Who is Kemi Mai? Tell us a bit about your educational background.Kemi Mai: I’m Eighteen, I live in the UK, I’m a self-taught artist, and I’ve been painting for almost two years.
A: How has the digital portrait painting initially captured your attention? Do you remember your first piece?KM: All I used to know of digital art was concept art and its place in the gaming and film industries, which was very interesting to me. I don’t think it’s an area that I could ever venture into, but I appreciate it greatly and I suppose it’s perhaps what the digital medium is best known for. I can’t say that I do remember my first piece, but I remember the point when I began to take painting seriously and feel as though there was a need for me to continue creating.
A: How would you describe your work and what do you aim to convey through it? KM: My work starts with an idea derived from thoughts or abstract feelings, which I aim to express in a way that also appeals to me atheistically. Colour has become incredibly important to me, it can be so influential in setting the overall tone of the piece. I like to think of the majority of my paintings as visual representations of things that couldn’t exist organically in real life. Whilst an element of realism is important to me, I haven’t ever been interested in depicting a scene that resembles a photograph without a concept. My work isn’t weighted with messages intended to change the world, but it’s something through which I can be honest, and I appreciate that freedom greatly.
A: Could you share with us your process and how did you come to develop your aesthetic?KM: I begin with an idea, then I usually sketch for around 15-30 minutes. If needed, I’ll clean up my sketch, and then go on to making a palette. From there, I’ll paint in sections, usually starting with my subject’s eyes. I think more recently, within the past few months, I really feel as though I’m beginning to settle into an aesthetic that feels right. I used to feel very weighted by a self-imposed pressure to develop my own personal style, but I think it was only when I stopped focusing on that aspect of my work that things actually began to fall into place.
A: Do you have special rituals to get into creating mood? KM: If I’m feeling inspired, I’ll just get straight into it. If I’m not really quite there yet, I’ll spend some time thinking about painting before actually doing it. I also do most of my work at nighttime and I usually play music or movies whilst I work, but also documentaries. I love nature and science documentaries.
A: If you have any advice for other artists that want to get into digital painting, what would you tell them?KM: Get the right tools, a graphics tablet and Photoshop or Painter are essential. Let go of any expectations about the medium, as what you’ve heard could be incredibly wrong. There’s this huge misconception that digital art is somehow easier or inferior to traditional mediums, but in fact, every medium from watercolour to oil to digital has its own set of pros and cons. When exploring any new medium, I’d say not to be too hard on yourself. There are lots of great tutorials out there on the internet, but the best way to progress is practice, by far.
A: Could you name 3 young artists to keep an eye on?KM: Natalie Foss (on Tumblr), whose understanding of colour is constantly amazing me. Paulette Jo (on Tumblr, see previous posts), I find a sense of escapeism within the detail of her work, which is always a sign of something special. Peony Yip (on Tumblr, see previous posts), whose work is both delicate in its simplicity whilst remaining rich and incredibly engaging.
A: What is your project for the coming year?KM: 2014 came around fast, but at the risk of sounding dangerously cliche, the only project I have planned is growth! Looking back on how my work has progressed through the past year really inspires me to keep working hard. I recently begun working on some commissioned projects, which I’ve already learnt a lot from, so I’m looking forward to any future projects. I also have a plethora of ideas for a personal works which I’m feeling rather apprehensive about, but I think that’s a good sign, and I’m planning to explore some old concepts in new ways.
Thanks Kemi for taking time out to answer these questions. Kemi Mai can be found with updated posts on her Instagram and Tumblr.
[more Kemi Mai aka drawinds | Art Writer’s Wednesday with Artchipel] Art Writer’s Wednesday 20 - Artist on Tumblr
Kemi Mai aka drawinds | on Tumblr (UK)
Kemi Mai, aka Drawinds, is a young artist who paints with pixels, using Photoshop and a tablet. Specializing in female portraits, the British artist often sets her subjects against surreal settings, incorporating geometric shapes or nature elements. Artchipel invites Kemi to speak about her personal story, creative process and plans for future projects.
Artchipel: Who is Kemi Mai? Tell us a bit about your educational background.Kemi Mai: I’m Eighteen, I live in the UK, I’m a self-taught artist, and I’ve been painting for almost two years.
A: How has the digital portrait painting initially captured your attention? Do you remember your first piece?KM: All I used to know of digital art was concept art and its place in the gaming and film industries, which was very interesting to me. I don’t think it’s an area that I could ever venture into, but I appreciate it greatly and I suppose it’s perhaps what the digital medium is best known for. I can’t say that I do remember my first piece, but I remember the point when I began to take painting seriously and feel as though there was a need for me to continue creating.
A: How would you describe your work and what do you aim to convey through it? KM: My work starts with an idea derived from thoughts or abstract feelings, which I aim to express in a way that also appeals to me atheistically. Colour has become incredibly important to me, it can be so influential in setting the overall tone of the piece. I like to think of the majority of my paintings as visual representations of things that couldn’t exist organically in real life. Whilst an element of realism is important to me, I haven’t ever been interested in depicting a scene that resembles a photograph without a concept. My work isn’t weighted with messages intended to change the world, but it’s something through which I can be honest, and I appreciate that freedom greatly.
A: Could you share with us your process and how did you come to develop your aesthetic?KM: I begin with an idea, then I usually sketch for around 15-30 minutes. If needed, I’ll clean up my sketch, and then go on to making a palette. From there, I’ll paint in sections, usually starting with my subject’s eyes. I think more recently, within the past few months, I really feel as though I’m beginning to settle into an aesthetic that feels right. I used to feel very weighted by a self-imposed pressure to develop my own personal style, but I think it was only when I stopped focusing on that aspect of my work that things actually began to fall into place.
A: Do you have special rituals to get into creating mood? KM: If I’m feeling inspired, I’ll just get straight into it. If I’m not really quite there yet, I’ll spend some time thinking about painting before actually doing it. I also do most of my work at nighttime and I usually play music or movies whilst I work, but also documentaries. I love nature and science documentaries.
A: If you have any advice for other artists that want to get into digital painting, what would you tell them?KM: Get the right tools, a graphics tablet and Photoshop or Painter are essential. Let go of any expectations about the medium, as what you’ve heard could be incredibly wrong. There’s this huge misconception that digital art is somehow easier or inferior to traditional mediums, but in fact, every medium from watercolour to oil to digital has its own set of pros and cons. When exploring any new medium, I’d say not to be too hard on yourself. There are lots of great tutorials out there on the internet, but the best way to progress is practice, by far.
A: Could you name 3 young artists to keep an eye on?KM: Natalie Foss (on Tumblr), whose understanding of colour is constantly amazing me. Paulette Jo (on Tumblr, see previous posts), I find a sense of escapeism within the detail of her work, which is always a sign of something special. Peony Yip (on Tumblr, see previous posts), whose work is both delicate in its simplicity whilst remaining rich and incredibly engaging.
A: What is your project for the coming year?KM: 2014 came around fast, but at the risk of sounding dangerously cliche, the only project I have planned is growth! Looking back on how my work has progressed through the past year really inspires me to keep working hard. I recently begun working on some commissioned projects, which I’ve already learnt a lot from, so I’m looking forward to any future projects. I also have a plethora of ideas for a personal works which I’m feeling rather apprehensive about, but I think that’s a good sign, and I’m planning to explore some old concepts in new ways.
Thanks Kemi for taking time out to answer these questions. Kemi Mai can be found with updated posts on her Instagram and Tumblr.
[more Kemi Mai aka drawinds | Art Writer’s Wednesday with Artchipel]
  • Redosking (USA) - Dino Tomic’s eye. Prismacolor and Crayola color pencils on Toned-Tan Paper
Texas-based graffiti artist Redosking draws fantastically detailed eyes using colored pencils. It seems like eyes are a common muse for illustrators working in the realm of hyperrealism but these particular pieces seem above and beyond the average attempt. You can also follow him on Instagram.
[more Redosking | artist found at Colossal]
  • Redosking (USA) - Dino Tomic’s eye. Prismacolor and Crayola color pencils on Toned-Tan Paper
Texas-based graffiti artist Redosking draws fantastically detailed eyes using colored pencils. It seems like eyes are a common muse for illustrators working in the realm of hyperrealism but these particular pieces seem above and beyond the average attempt. You can also follow him on Instagram.
[more Redosking | artist found at Colossal]
  • Redosking (USA) - Dino Tomic’s eye. Prismacolor and Crayola color pencils on Toned-Tan Paper
Texas-based graffiti artist Redosking draws fantastically detailed eyes using colored pencils. It seems like eyes are a common muse for illustrators working in the realm of hyperrealism but these particular pieces seem above and beyond the average attempt. You can also follow him on Instagram.
[more Redosking | artist found at Colossal]
  • Redosking (USA) - Dino Tomic’s eye. Prismacolor and Crayola color pencils on Toned-Tan Paper
Texas-based graffiti artist Redosking draws fantastically detailed eyes using colored pencils. It seems like eyes are a common muse for illustrators working in the realm of hyperrealism but these particular pieces seem above and beyond the average attempt. You can also follow him on Instagram.
[more Redosking | artist found at Colossal]
  • Redosking (USA) - Dino Tomic’s eye. Prismacolor and Crayola color pencils on Toned-Tan Paper
Texas-based graffiti artist Redosking draws fantastically detailed eyes using colored pencils. It seems like eyes are a common muse for illustrators working in the realm of hyperrealism but these particular pieces seem above and beyond the average attempt. You can also follow him on Instagram.
[more Redosking | artist found at Colossal]
  • Redosking (USA) - Dino Tomic’s eye. Prismacolor and Crayola color pencils on Toned-Tan Paper
Texas-based graffiti artist Redosking draws fantastically detailed eyes using colored pencils. It seems like eyes are a common muse for illustrators working in the realm of hyperrealism but these particular pieces seem above and beyond the average attempt. You can also follow him on Instagram.
[more Redosking | artist found at Colossal]
  • Redosking (USA) - Dino Tomic’s eye. Prismacolor and Crayola color pencils on Toned-Tan Paper
Texas-based graffiti artist Redosking draws fantastically detailed eyes using colored pencils. It seems like eyes are a common muse for illustrators working in the realm of hyperrealism but these particular pieces seem above and beyond the average attempt. You can also follow him on Instagram.
[more Redosking | artist found at Colossal]
  • Redosking (USA) - Dino Tomic’s eye. Prismacolor and Crayola color pencils on Toned-Tan Paper
Texas-based graffiti artist Redosking draws fantastically detailed eyes using colored pencils. It seems like eyes are a common muse for illustrators working in the realm of hyperrealism but these particular pieces seem above and beyond the average attempt. You can also follow him on Instagram.
[more Redosking | artist found at Colossal]
Redosking (USA) - Dino Tomic’s eye. Prismacolor and Crayola color pencils on Toned-Tan Paper
Texas-based graffiti artist Redosking draws fantastically detailed eyes using colored pencils. It seems like eyes are a common muse for illustrators working in the realm of hyperrealism but these particular pieces seem above and beyond the average attempt. You can also follow him on Instagram.
[more Redosking | artist found at Colossal] Redosking (USA) - Dino Tomic’s eye. Prismacolor and Crayola color pencils on Toned-Tan Paper
Texas-based graffiti artist Redosking draws fantastically detailed eyes using colored pencils. It seems like eyes are a common muse for illustrators working in the realm of hyperrealism but these particular pieces seem above and beyond the average attempt. You can also follow him on Instagram.
[more Redosking | artist found at Colossal] Redosking (USA) - Dino Tomic’s eye. Prismacolor and Crayola color pencils on Toned-Tan Paper
Texas-based graffiti artist Redosking draws fantastically detailed eyes using colored pencils. It seems like eyes are a common muse for illustrators working in the realm of hyperrealism but these particular pieces seem above and beyond the average attempt. You can also follow him on Instagram.
[more Redosking | artist found at Colossal] Redosking (USA) - Dino Tomic’s eye. Prismacolor and Crayola color pencils on Toned-Tan Paper
Texas-based graffiti artist Redosking draws fantastically detailed eyes using colored pencils. It seems like eyes are a common muse for illustrators working in the realm of hyperrealism but these particular pieces seem above and beyond the average attempt. You can also follow him on Instagram.
[more Redosking | artist found at Colossal]
  • Artist on Tumblr
Mrzyk & Moriceau | on Tumblr 
Petra Mrzyk was born in Nuremberg, Germany. She lives and works with French artist Jean-François Moriceau in Mont Jean sur Loire, France. Together and since 1999, they create fantastic drawings on multiple supports, such as paper, wall or animation. Mainly black, white and red, their works are inspired by popular imagery. Often hallucinatory and surreal, their drawing is avant-garde, playful and poetic. 
[more Mrzyk & Moriceau | artist found at nevver]
  • Artist on Tumblr
Mrzyk & Moriceau | on Tumblr 
Petra Mrzyk was born in Nuremberg, Germany. She lives and works with French artist Jean-François Moriceau in Mont Jean sur Loire, France. Together and since 1999, they create fantastic drawings on multiple supports, such as paper, wall or animation. Mainly black, white and red, their works are inspired by popular imagery. Often hallucinatory and surreal, their drawing is avant-garde, playful and poetic. 
[more Mrzyk & Moriceau | artist found at nevver]
  • Artist on Tumblr
Mrzyk & Moriceau | on Tumblr 
Petra Mrzyk was born in Nuremberg, Germany. She lives and works with French artist Jean-François Moriceau in Mont Jean sur Loire, France. Together and since 1999, they create fantastic drawings on multiple supports, such as paper, wall or animation. Mainly black, white and red, their works are inspired by popular imagery. Often hallucinatory and surreal, their drawing is avant-garde, playful and poetic. 
[more Mrzyk & Moriceau | artist found at nevver]
  • Artist on Tumblr
Mrzyk & Moriceau | on Tumblr 
Petra Mrzyk was born in Nuremberg, Germany. She lives and works with French artist Jean-François Moriceau in Mont Jean sur Loire, France. Together and since 1999, they create fantastic drawings on multiple supports, such as paper, wall or animation. Mainly black, white and red, their works are inspired by popular imagery. Often hallucinatory and surreal, their drawing is avant-garde, playful and poetic. 
[more Mrzyk & Moriceau | artist found at nevver]
  • Artist on Tumblr
Mrzyk & Moriceau | on Tumblr 
Petra Mrzyk was born in Nuremberg, Germany. She lives and works with French artist Jean-François Moriceau in Mont Jean sur Loire, France. Together and since 1999, they create fantastic drawings on multiple supports, such as paper, wall or animation. Mainly black, white and red, their works are inspired by popular imagery. Often hallucinatory and surreal, their drawing is avant-garde, playful and poetic. 
[more Mrzyk & Moriceau | artist found at nevver]
  • Artist on Tumblr
Mrzyk & Moriceau | on Tumblr 
Petra Mrzyk was born in Nuremberg, Germany. She lives and works with French artist Jean-François Moriceau in Mont Jean sur Loire, France. Together and since 1999, they create fantastic drawings on multiple supports, such as paper, wall or animation. Mainly black, white and red, their works are inspired by popular imagery. Often hallucinatory and surreal, their drawing is avant-garde, playful and poetic. 
[more Mrzyk & Moriceau | artist found at nevver]
  • Artist on Tumblr
Mrzyk & Moriceau | on Tumblr 
Petra Mrzyk was born in Nuremberg, Germany. She lives and works with French artist Jean-François Moriceau in Mont Jean sur Loire, France. Together and since 1999, they create fantastic drawings on multiple supports, such as paper, wall or animation. Mainly black, white and red, their works are inspired by popular imagery. Often hallucinatory and surreal, their drawing is avant-garde, playful and poetic. 
[more Mrzyk & Moriceau | artist found at nevver]
  • Artist on Tumblr
Mrzyk & Moriceau | on Tumblr 
Petra Mrzyk was born in Nuremberg, Germany. She lives and works with French artist Jean-François Moriceau in Mont Jean sur Loire, France. Together and since 1999, they create fantastic drawings on multiple supports, such as paper, wall or animation. Mainly black, white and red, their works are inspired by popular imagery. Often hallucinatory and surreal, their drawing is avant-garde, playful and poetic. 
[more Mrzyk & Moriceau | artist found at nevver]
  • Artist on Tumblr
Mrzyk & Moriceau | on Tumblr 
Petra Mrzyk was born in Nuremberg, Germany. She lives and works with French artist Jean-François Moriceau in Mont Jean sur Loire, France. Together and since 1999, they create fantastic drawings on multiple supports, such as paper, wall or animation. Mainly black, white and red, their works are inspired by popular imagery. Often hallucinatory and surreal, their drawing is avant-garde, playful and poetic. 
[more Mrzyk & Moriceau | artist found at nevver]
  • Artist on Tumblr
Mrzyk & Moriceau | on Tumblr 
Petra Mrzyk was born in Nuremberg, Germany. She lives and works with French artist Jean-François Moriceau in Mont Jean sur Loire, France. Together and since 1999, they create fantastic drawings on multiple supports, such as paper, wall or animation. Mainly black, white and red, their works are inspired by popular imagery. Often hallucinatory and surreal, their drawing is avant-garde, playful and poetic. 
[more Mrzyk & Moriceau | artist found at nevver]
  • Artist on Tumblr
Mrzyk & Moriceau | on Tumblr 
Petra Mrzyk was born in Nuremberg, Germany. She lives and works with French artist Jean-François Moriceau in Mont Jean sur Loire, France. Together and since 1999, they create fantastic drawings on multiple supports, such as paper, wall or animation. Mainly black, white and red, their works are inspired by popular imagery. Often hallucinatory and surreal, their drawing is avant-garde, playful and poetic. 
[more Mrzyk & Moriceau | artist found at nevver]
  • Artist on Tumblr
Mrzyk & Moriceau | on Tumblr 
Petra Mrzyk was born in Nuremberg, Germany. She lives and works with French artist Jean-François Moriceau in Mont Jean sur Loire, France. Together and since 1999, they create fantastic drawings on multiple supports, such as paper, wall or animation. Mainly black, white and red, their works are inspired by popular imagery. Often hallucinatory and surreal, their drawing is avant-garde, playful and poetic. 
[more Mrzyk & Moriceau | artist found at nevver]
Artist on Tumblr
Mrzyk & Moriceau | on Tumblr 
Petra Mrzyk was born in Nuremberg, Germany. She lives and works with French artist Jean-François Moriceau in Mont Jean sur Loire, France. Together and since 1999, they create fantastic drawings on multiple supports, such as paper, wall or animation. Mainly black, white and red, their works are inspired by popular imagery. Often hallucinatory and surreal, their drawing is avant-garde, playful and poetic. 
[more Mrzyk & Moriceau | artist found at nevver] Artist on Tumblr
Mrzyk & Moriceau | on Tumblr 
Petra Mrzyk was born in Nuremberg, Germany. She lives and works with French artist Jean-François Moriceau in Mont Jean sur Loire, France. Together and since 1999, they create fantastic drawings on multiple supports, such as paper, wall or animation. Mainly black, white and red, their works are inspired by popular imagery. Often hallucinatory and surreal, their drawing is avant-garde, playful and poetic. 
[more Mrzyk & Moriceau | artist found at nevver] Artist on Tumblr
Mrzyk & Moriceau | on Tumblr 
Petra Mrzyk was born in Nuremberg, Germany. She lives and works with French artist Jean-François Moriceau in Mont Jean sur Loire, France. Together and since 1999, they create fantastic drawings on multiple supports, such as paper, wall or animation. Mainly black, white and red, their works are inspired by popular imagery. Often hallucinatory and surreal, their drawing is avant-garde, playful and poetic. 
[more Mrzyk & Moriceau | artist found at nevver] Artist on Tumblr
Mrzyk & Moriceau | on Tumblr 
Petra Mrzyk was born in Nuremberg, Germany. She lives and works with French artist Jean-François Moriceau in Mont Jean sur Loire, France. Together and since 1999, they create fantastic drawings on multiple supports, such as paper, wall or animation. Mainly black, white and red, their works are inspired by popular imagery. Often hallucinatory and surreal, their drawing is avant-garde, playful and poetic. 
[more Mrzyk & Moriceau | artist found at nevver] Artist on Tumblr
Mrzyk & Moriceau | on Tumblr 
Petra Mrzyk was born in Nuremberg, Germany. She lives and works with French artist Jean-François Moriceau in Mont Jean sur Loire, France. Together and since 1999, they create fantastic drawings on multiple supports, such as paper, wall or animation. Mainly black, white and red, their works are inspired by popular imagery. Often hallucinatory and surreal, their drawing is avant-garde, playful and poetic. 
[more Mrzyk & Moriceau | artist found at nevver] Artist on Tumblr
Mrzyk & Moriceau | on Tumblr 
Petra Mrzyk was born in Nuremberg, Germany. She lives and works with French artist Jean-François Moriceau in Mont Jean sur Loire, France. Together and since 1999, they create fantastic drawings on multiple supports, such as paper, wall or animation. Mainly black, white and red, their works are inspired by popular imagery. Often hallucinatory and surreal, their drawing is avant-garde, playful and poetic. 
[more Mrzyk & Moriceau | artist found at nevver]
  • Art Writer’s Wednesday 18 
Daehyun Kim aka Moonassi (b.1980, South Korea)
Korean artist Daehyun Kim, better known as Moonassi, is the author of a series of beautiful and intriguing black and white drawings. By mixing surreal and figurative imagery, Daehyun creates a voyage exploring human conditions and situation with a simple yet very unique way. Two year after his fist feature on Artchipel, we catch up with Artist to chat with us about his story, creative process and future projects.
Artchipel: Hi Daehyun, tell us about your education background and your practice.Daehyun Kim: I was born in Seoul, South Korea in 1980. I majored in Oriental Painting. The word “Oriental” could make you confused. It’s actually a study of the old East Asian painting where I learned about related skills such as Ink wash painting, but also ancient East Asian philosophies and aesthetics.
A: You have been working on Moonassi drawing series since 2008. What does Moonassi mean?DK: Moonassi is my artist name that I’ve been using since long ago. It was “무나 moonaa” at the beginning and has become “무나씨 moona-ssi” as people get used to the name. (“-씨 -ssi” is the most commonly used honorific forms of address in Korean, used amongst people of approximately equal speech level. It is attached at the end of the full name or simply after the first name if the speaker is more familiar with someone.) 
“무나 moonaa” can be roughly translated as “There is no such thing as me”, or “Emptiness / Void in me”. When people call me “Moonassi”, it’s like if they are calling someone who has no identity. Isn’t it interesting?
A: You have a very distinctive identity. Could you share with us your creative process and how did you come to develop your aesthetic?DK: At the beginning, I’ve never thought that my drawing is unique. But the more I draw, the more it became something special naturally. I just focused on what I really can draw, what I really want to draw, and what I prefer to use. The process is always changing. Usually I start with just a simple image that flashes across my mind, but sometimes I just concentrate on the subject or a word that I want to express. It’s almost like translating words into images.
A: You often put on stage one or several human figures with a very similar look, we can hardly identify their gender or age! Yet each of them seems to have a strong spirit and imparts a universal message to human hearts. Tell us a bit about these intriguing characters.DK: The face with no expression actually is borrowed from old buddies painting which has always fascinated me since University. I thought that the face is perfect to conceal their feelings, because I don’t want to show directly if this guy is good or bad through their faces. The black simple suit that looks like underwear has been chosen to make you only focus on their gesture. I purposely don’t show the time, region or gender. 
A: Do you have special rituals to get into creating mood?  DK: Yeah I used to believe that there must be some special rituals to be able to create. For example, pushing myself into extremely bad or sad mood, sitting on the desk all night doing nothing like a zombie until something comes up in my mind, and so on. But now I’m trying to ignore these bad rituals. Somehow, now I can draw when I want to do. And I’m so happy that I can draw even during the daytime.
A: Which artists have inspired you the most?DK: Interestingly, I’ve never got inspired by any contemporary artist. I’m more inspired by writings, songs and videos. I collect lots of images, songs and videos from Internet, but unfortunately, I forget easily artist’s names or artwork titles. 
A: What has been your strongest memory to date as an artist?DK: Sometimes, people send me a photo of his/her having my drawing tattooed on their skin. It’s really strange and beautiful to see my drawing on someone else’s body.
A: What is your project for the upcoming year?DK: Making a new picture book, selling prints, hiking mountains and partying with friends more often, working less in the office and drawing more in my studio!
Thanks Daehyun for taking the time to answer the questions. Daehyun Kim can be found with updated posts on his Website and Facebook. His book Anonymous Drawing is available for purchase on Studiofnt.
[more Daehyun Kim aka Moonassi | Art Writer’s Wednesday with Artchipel]
  • Art Writer’s Wednesday 18 
Daehyun Kim aka Moonassi (b.1980, South Korea)
Korean artist Daehyun Kim, better known as Moonassi, is the author of a series of beautiful and intriguing black and white drawings. By mixing surreal and figurative imagery, Daehyun creates a voyage exploring human conditions and situation with a simple yet very unique way. Two year after his fist feature on Artchipel, we catch up with Artist to chat with us about his story, creative process and future projects.
Artchipel: Hi Daehyun, tell us about your education background and your practice.Daehyun Kim: I was born in Seoul, South Korea in 1980. I majored in Oriental Painting. The word “Oriental” could make you confused. It’s actually a study of the old East Asian painting where I learned about related skills such as Ink wash painting, but also ancient East Asian philosophies and aesthetics.
A: You have been working on Moonassi drawing series since 2008. What does Moonassi mean?DK: Moonassi is my artist name that I’ve been using since long ago. It was “무나 moonaa” at the beginning and has become “무나씨 moona-ssi” as people get used to the name. (“-씨 -ssi” is the most commonly used honorific forms of address in Korean, used amongst people of approximately equal speech level. It is attached at the end of the full name or simply after the first name if the speaker is more familiar with someone.) 
“무나 moonaa” can be roughly translated as “There is no such thing as me”, or “Emptiness / Void in me”. When people call me “Moonassi”, it’s like if they are calling someone who has no identity. Isn’t it interesting?
A: You have a very distinctive identity. Could you share with us your creative process and how did you come to develop your aesthetic?DK: At the beginning, I’ve never thought that my drawing is unique. But the more I draw, the more it became something special naturally. I just focused on what I really can draw, what I really want to draw, and what I prefer to use. The process is always changing. Usually I start with just a simple image that flashes across my mind, but sometimes I just concentrate on the subject or a word that I want to express. It’s almost like translating words into images.
A: You often put on stage one or several human figures with a very similar look, we can hardly identify their gender or age! Yet each of them seems to have a strong spirit and imparts a universal message to human hearts. Tell us a bit about these intriguing characters.DK: The face with no expression actually is borrowed from old buddies painting which has always fascinated me since University. I thought that the face is perfect to conceal their feelings, because I don’t want to show directly if this guy is good or bad through their faces. The black simple suit that looks like underwear has been chosen to make you only focus on their gesture. I purposely don’t show the time, region or gender. 
A: Do you have special rituals to get into creating mood?  DK: Yeah I used to believe that there must be some special rituals to be able to create. For example, pushing myself into extremely bad or sad mood, sitting on the desk all night doing nothing like a zombie until something comes up in my mind, and so on. But now I’m trying to ignore these bad rituals. Somehow, now I can draw when I want to do. And I’m so happy that I can draw even during the daytime.
A: Which artists have inspired you the most?DK: Interestingly, I’ve never got inspired by any contemporary artist. I’m more inspired by writings, songs and videos. I collect lots of images, songs and videos from Internet, but unfortunately, I forget easily artist’s names or artwork titles. 
A: What has been your strongest memory to date as an artist?DK: Sometimes, people send me a photo of his/her having my drawing tattooed on their skin. It’s really strange and beautiful to see my drawing on someone else’s body.
A: What is your project for the upcoming year?DK: Making a new picture book, selling prints, hiking mountains and partying with friends more often, working less in the office and drawing more in my studio!
Thanks Daehyun for taking the time to answer the questions. Daehyun Kim can be found with updated posts on his Website and Facebook. His book Anonymous Drawing is available for purchase on Studiofnt.
[more Daehyun Kim aka Moonassi | Art Writer’s Wednesday with Artchipel]
  • Art Writer’s Wednesday 18 
Daehyun Kim aka Moonassi (b.1980, South Korea)
Korean artist Daehyun Kim, better known as Moonassi, is the author of a series of beautiful and intriguing black and white drawings. By mixing surreal and figurative imagery, Daehyun creates a voyage exploring human conditions and situation with a simple yet very unique way. Two year after his fist feature on Artchipel, we catch up with Artist to chat with us about his story, creative process and future projects.
Artchipel: Hi Daehyun, tell us about your education background and your practice.Daehyun Kim: I was born in Seoul, South Korea in 1980. I majored in Oriental Painting. The word “Oriental” could make you confused. It’s actually a study of the old East Asian painting where I learned about related skills such as Ink wash painting, but also ancient East Asian philosophies and aesthetics.
A: You have been working on Moonassi drawing series since 2008. What does Moonassi mean?DK: Moonassi is my artist name that I’ve been using since long ago. It was “무나 moonaa” at the beginning and has become “무나씨 moona-ssi” as people get used to the name. (“-씨 -ssi” is the most commonly used honorific forms of address in Korean, used amongst people of approximately equal speech level. It is attached at the end of the full name or simply after the first name if the speaker is more familiar with someone.) 
“무나 moonaa” can be roughly translated as “There is no such thing as me”, or “Emptiness / Void in me”. When people call me “Moonassi”, it’s like if they are calling someone who has no identity. Isn’t it interesting?
A: You have a very distinctive identity. Could you share with us your creative process and how did you come to develop your aesthetic?DK: At the beginning, I’ve never thought that my drawing is unique. But the more I draw, the more it became something special naturally. I just focused on what I really can draw, what I really want to draw, and what I prefer to use. The process is always changing. Usually I start with just a simple image that flashes across my mind, but sometimes I just concentrate on the subject or a word that I want to express. It’s almost like translating words into images.
A: You often put on stage one or several human figures with a very similar look, we can hardly identify their gender or age! Yet each of them seems to have a strong spirit and imparts a universal message to human hearts. Tell us a bit about these intriguing characters.DK: The face with no expression actually is borrowed from old buddies painting which has always fascinated me since University. I thought that the face is perfect to conceal their feelings, because I don’t want to show directly if this guy is good or bad through their faces. The black simple suit that looks like underwear has been chosen to make you only focus on their gesture. I purposely don’t show the time, region or gender. 
A: Do you have special rituals to get into creating mood?  DK: Yeah I used to believe that there must be some special rituals to be able to create. For example, pushing myself into extremely bad or sad mood, sitting on the desk all night doing nothing like a zombie until something comes up in my mind, and so on. But now I’m trying to ignore these bad rituals. Somehow, now I can draw when I want to do. And I’m so happy that I can draw even during the daytime.
A: Which artists have inspired you the most?DK: Interestingly, I’ve never got inspired by any contemporary artist. I’m more inspired by writings, songs and videos. I collect lots of images, songs and videos from Internet, but unfortunately, I forget easily artist’s names or artwork titles. 
A: What has been your strongest memory to date as an artist?DK: Sometimes, people send me a photo of his/her having my drawing tattooed on their skin. It’s really strange and beautiful to see my drawing on someone else’s body.
A: What is your project for the upcoming year?DK: Making a new picture book, selling prints, hiking mountains and partying with friends more often, working less in the office and drawing more in my studio!
Thanks Daehyun for taking the time to answer the questions. Daehyun Kim can be found with updated posts on his Website and Facebook. His book Anonymous Drawing is available for purchase on Studiofnt.
[more Daehyun Kim aka Moonassi | Art Writer’s Wednesday with Artchipel]
  • Art Writer’s Wednesday 18 
Daehyun Kim aka Moonassi (b.1980, South Korea)
Korean artist Daehyun Kim, better known as Moonassi, is the author of a series of beautiful and intriguing black and white drawings. By mixing surreal and figurative imagery, Daehyun creates a voyage exploring human conditions and situation with a simple yet very unique way. Two year after his fist feature on Artchipel, we catch up with Artist to chat with us about his story, creative process and future projects.
Artchipel: Hi Daehyun, tell us about your education background and your practice.Daehyun Kim: I was born in Seoul, South Korea in 1980. I majored in Oriental Painting. The word “Oriental” could make you confused. It’s actually a study of the old East Asian painting where I learned about related skills such as Ink wash painting, but also ancient East Asian philosophies and aesthetics.
A: You have been working on Moonassi drawing series since 2008. What does Moonassi mean?DK: Moonassi is my artist name that I’ve been using since long ago. It was “무나 moonaa” at the beginning and has become “무나씨 moona-ssi” as people get used to the name. (“-씨 -ssi” is the most commonly used honorific forms of address in Korean, used amongst people of approximately equal speech level. It is attached at the end of the full name or simply after the first name if the speaker is more familiar with someone.) 
“무나 moonaa” can be roughly translated as “There is no such thing as me”, or “Emptiness / Void in me”. When people call me “Moonassi”, it’s like if they are calling someone who has no identity. Isn’t it interesting?
A: You have a very distinctive identity. Could you share with us your creative process and how did you come to develop your aesthetic?DK: At the beginning, I’ve never thought that my drawing is unique. But the more I draw, the more it became something special naturally. I just focused on what I really can draw, what I really want to draw, and what I prefer to use. The process is always changing. Usually I start with just a simple image that flashes across my mind, but sometimes I just concentrate on the subject or a word that I want to express. It’s almost like translating words into images.
A: You often put on stage one or several human figures with a very similar look, we can hardly identify their gender or age! Yet each of them seems to have a strong spirit and imparts a universal message to human hearts. Tell us a bit about these intriguing characters.DK: The face with no expression actually is borrowed from old buddies painting which has always fascinated me since University. I thought that the face is perfect to conceal their feelings, because I don’t want to show directly if this guy is good or bad through their faces. The black simple suit that looks like underwear has been chosen to make you only focus on their gesture. I purposely don’t show the time, region or gender. 
A: Do you have special rituals to get into creating mood?  DK: Yeah I used to believe that there must be some special rituals to be able to create. For example, pushing myself into extremely bad or sad mood, sitting on the desk all night doing nothing like a zombie until something comes up in my mind, and so on. But now I’m trying to ignore these bad rituals. Somehow, now I can draw when I want to do. And I’m so happy that I can draw even during the daytime.
A: Which artists have inspired you the most?DK: Interestingly, I’ve never got inspired by any contemporary artist. I’m more inspired by writings, songs and videos. I collect lots of images, songs and videos from Internet, but unfortunately, I forget easily artist’s names or artwork titles. 
A: What has been your strongest memory to date as an artist?DK: Sometimes, people send me a photo of his/her having my drawing tattooed on their skin. It’s really strange and beautiful to see my drawing on someone else’s body.
A: What is your project for the upcoming year?DK: Making a new picture book, selling prints, hiking mountains and partying with friends more often, working less in the office and drawing more in my studio!
Thanks Daehyun for taking the time to answer the questions. Daehyun Kim can be found with updated posts on his Website and Facebook. His book Anonymous Drawing is available for purchase on Studiofnt.
[more Daehyun Kim aka Moonassi | Art Writer’s Wednesday with Artchipel]
  • Art Writer’s Wednesday 18 
Daehyun Kim aka Moonassi (b.1980, South Korea)
Korean artist Daehyun Kim, better known as Moonassi, is the author of a series of beautiful and intriguing black and white drawings. By mixing surreal and figurative imagery, Daehyun creates a voyage exploring human conditions and situation with a simple yet very unique way. Two year after his fist feature on Artchipel, we catch up with Artist to chat with us about his story, creative process and future projects.
Artchipel: Hi Daehyun, tell us about your education background and your practice.Daehyun Kim: I was born in Seoul, South Korea in 1980. I majored in Oriental Painting. The word “Oriental” could make you confused. It’s actually a study of the old East Asian painting where I learned about related skills such as Ink wash painting, but also ancient East Asian philosophies and aesthetics.
A: You have been working on Moonassi drawing series since 2008. What does Moonassi mean?DK: Moonassi is my artist name that I’ve been using since long ago. It was “무나 moonaa” at the beginning and has become “무나씨 moona-ssi” as people get used to the name. (“-씨 -ssi” is the most commonly used honorific forms of address in Korean, used amongst people of approximately equal speech level. It is attached at the end of the full name or simply after the first name if the speaker is more familiar with someone.) 
“무나 moonaa” can be roughly translated as “There is no such thing as me”, or “Emptiness / Void in me”. When people call me “Moonassi”, it’s like if they are calling someone who has no identity. Isn’t it interesting?
A: You have a very distinctive identity. Could you share with us your creative process and how did you come to develop your aesthetic?DK: At the beginning, I’ve never thought that my drawing is unique. But the more I draw, the more it became something special naturally. I just focused on what I really can draw, what I really want to draw, and what I prefer to use. The process is always changing. Usually I start with just a simple image that flashes across my mind, but sometimes I just concentrate on the subject or a word that I want to express. It’s almost like translating words into images.
A: You often put on stage one or several human figures with a very similar look, we can hardly identify their gender or age! Yet each of them seems to have a strong spirit and imparts a universal message to human hearts. Tell us a bit about these intriguing characters.DK: The face with no expression actually is borrowed from old buddies painting which has always fascinated me since University. I thought that the face is perfect to conceal their feelings, because I don’t want to show directly if this guy is good or bad through their faces. The black simple suit that looks like underwear has been chosen to make you only focus on their gesture. I purposely don’t show the time, region or gender. 
A: Do you have special rituals to get into creating mood?  DK: Yeah I used to believe that there must be some special rituals to be able to create. For example, pushing myself into extremely bad or sad mood, sitting on the desk all night doing nothing like a zombie until something comes up in my mind, and so on. But now I’m trying to ignore these bad rituals. Somehow, now I can draw when I want to do. And I’m so happy that I can draw even during the daytime.
A: Which artists have inspired you the most?DK: Interestingly, I’ve never got inspired by any contemporary artist. I’m more inspired by writings, songs and videos. I collect lots of images, songs and videos from Internet, but unfortunately, I forget easily artist’s names or artwork titles. 
A: What has been your strongest memory to date as an artist?DK: Sometimes, people send me a photo of his/her having my drawing tattooed on their skin. It’s really strange and beautiful to see my drawing on someone else’s body.
A: What is your project for the upcoming year?DK: Making a new picture book, selling prints, hiking mountains and partying with friends more often, working less in the office and drawing more in my studio!
Thanks Daehyun for taking the time to answer the questions. Daehyun Kim can be found with updated posts on his Website and Facebook. His book Anonymous Drawing is available for purchase on Studiofnt.
[more Daehyun Kim aka Moonassi | Art Writer’s Wednesday with Artchipel]
  • Art Writer’s Wednesday 18 
Daehyun Kim aka Moonassi (b.1980, South Korea)
Korean artist Daehyun Kim, better known as Moonassi, is the author of a series of beautiful and intriguing black and white drawings. By mixing surreal and figurative imagery, Daehyun creates a voyage exploring human conditions and situation with a simple yet very unique way. Two year after his fist feature on Artchipel, we catch up with Artist to chat with us about his story, creative process and future projects.
Artchipel: Hi Daehyun, tell us about your education background and your practice.Daehyun Kim: I was born in Seoul, South Korea in 1980. I majored in Oriental Painting. The word “Oriental” could make you confused. It’s actually a study of the old East Asian painting where I learned about related skills such as Ink wash painting, but also ancient East Asian philosophies and aesthetics.
A: You have been working on Moonassi drawing series since 2008. What does Moonassi mean?DK: Moonassi is my artist name that I’ve been using since long ago. It was “무나 moonaa” at the beginning and has become “무나씨 moona-ssi” as people get used to the name. (“-씨 -ssi” is the most commonly used honorific forms of address in Korean, used amongst people of approximately equal speech level. It is attached at the end of the full name or simply after the first name if the speaker is more familiar with someone.) 
“무나 moonaa” can be roughly translated as “There is no such thing as me”, or “Emptiness / Void in me”. When people call me “Moonassi”, it’s like if they are calling someone who has no identity. Isn’t it interesting?
A: You have a very distinctive identity. Could you share with us your creative process and how did you come to develop your aesthetic?DK: At the beginning, I’ve never thought that my drawing is unique. But the more I draw, the more it became something special naturally. I just focused on what I really can draw, what I really want to draw, and what I prefer to use. The process is always changing. Usually I start with just a simple image that flashes across my mind, but sometimes I just concentrate on the subject or a word that I want to express. It’s almost like translating words into images.
A: You often put on stage one or several human figures with a very similar look, we can hardly identify their gender or age! Yet each of them seems to have a strong spirit and imparts a universal message to human hearts. Tell us a bit about these intriguing characters.DK: The face with no expression actually is borrowed from old buddies painting which has always fascinated me since University. I thought that the face is perfect to conceal their feelings, because I don’t want to show directly if this guy is good or bad through their faces. The black simple suit that looks like underwear has been chosen to make you only focus on their gesture. I purposely don’t show the time, region or gender. 
A: Do you have special rituals to get into creating mood?  DK: Yeah I used to believe that there must be some special rituals to be able to create. For example, pushing myself into extremely bad or sad mood, sitting on the desk all night doing nothing like a zombie until something comes up in my mind, and so on. But now I’m trying to ignore these bad rituals. Somehow, now I can draw when I want to do. And I’m so happy that I can draw even during the daytime.
A: Which artists have inspired you the most?DK: Interestingly, I’ve never got inspired by any contemporary artist. I’m more inspired by writings, songs and videos. I collect lots of images, songs and videos from Internet, but unfortunately, I forget easily artist’s names or artwork titles. 
A: What has been your strongest memory to date as an artist?DK: Sometimes, people send me a photo of his/her having my drawing tattooed on their skin. It’s really strange and beautiful to see my drawing on someone else’s body.
A: What is your project for the upcoming year?DK: Making a new picture book, selling prints, hiking mountains and partying with friends more often, working less in the office and drawing more in my studio!
Thanks Daehyun for taking the time to answer the questions. Daehyun Kim can be found with updated posts on his Website and Facebook. His book Anonymous Drawing is available for purchase on Studiofnt.
[more Daehyun Kim aka Moonassi | Art Writer’s Wednesday with Artchipel]
  • Art Writer’s Wednesday 18 
Daehyun Kim aka Moonassi (b.1980, South Korea)
Korean artist Daehyun Kim, better known as Moonassi, is the author of a series of beautiful and intriguing black and white drawings. By mixing surreal and figurative imagery, Daehyun creates a voyage exploring human conditions and situation with a simple yet very unique way. Two year after his fist feature on Artchipel, we catch up with Artist to chat with us about his story, creative process and future projects.
Artchipel: Hi Daehyun, tell us about your education background and your practice.Daehyun Kim: I was born in Seoul, South Korea in 1980. I majored in Oriental Painting. The word “Oriental” could make you confused. It’s actually a study of the old East Asian painting where I learned about related skills such as Ink wash painting, but also ancient East Asian philosophies and aesthetics.
A: You have been working on Moonassi drawing series since 2008. What does Moonassi mean?DK: Moonassi is my artist name that I’ve been using since long ago. It was “무나 moonaa” at the beginning and has become “무나씨 moona-ssi” as people get used to the name. (“-씨 -ssi” is the most commonly used honorific forms of address in Korean, used amongst people of approximately equal speech level. It is attached at the end of the full name or simply after the first name if the speaker is more familiar with someone.) 
“무나 moonaa” can be roughly translated as “There is no such thing as me”, or “Emptiness / Void in me”. When people call me “Moonassi”, it’s like if they are calling someone who has no identity. Isn’t it interesting?
A: You have a very distinctive identity. Could you share with us your creative process and how did you come to develop your aesthetic?DK: At the beginning, I’ve never thought that my drawing is unique. But the more I draw, the more it became something special naturally. I just focused on what I really can draw, what I really want to draw, and what I prefer to use. The process is always changing. Usually I start with just a simple image that flashes across my mind, but sometimes I just concentrate on the subject or a word that I want to express. It’s almost like translating words into images.
A: You often put on stage one or several human figures with a very similar look, we can hardly identify their gender or age! Yet each of them seems to have a strong spirit and imparts a universal message to human hearts. Tell us a bit about these intriguing characters.DK: The face with no expression actually is borrowed from old buddies painting which has always fascinated me since University. I thought that the face is perfect to conceal their feelings, because I don’t want to show directly if this guy is good or bad through their faces. The black simple suit that looks like underwear has been chosen to make you only focus on their gesture. I purposely don’t show the time, region or gender. 
A: Do you have special rituals to get into creating mood?  DK: Yeah I used to believe that there must be some special rituals to be able to create. For example, pushing myself into extremely bad or sad mood, sitting on the desk all night doing nothing like a zombie until something comes up in my mind, and so on. But now I’m trying to ignore these bad rituals. Somehow, now I can draw when I want to do. And I’m so happy that I can draw even during the daytime.
A: Which artists have inspired you the most?DK: Interestingly, I’ve never got inspired by any contemporary artist. I’m more inspired by writings, songs and videos. I collect lots of images, songs and videos from Internet, but unfortunately, I forget easily artist’s names or artwork titles. 
A: What has been your strongest memory to date as an artist?DK: Sometimes, people send me a photo of his/her having my drawing tattooed on their skin. It’s really strange and beautiful to see my drawing on someone else’s body.
A: What is your project for the upcoming year?DK: Making a new picture book, selling prints, hiking mountains and partying with friends more often, working less in the office and drawing more in my studio!
Thanks Daehyun for taking the time to answer the questions. Daehyun Kim can be found with updated posts on his Website and Facebook. His book Anonymous Drawing is available for purchase on Studiofnt.
[more Daehyun Kim aka Moonassi | Art Writer’s Wednesday with Artchipel]
  • Art Writer’s Wednesday 18 
Daehyun Kim aka Moonassi (b.1980, South Korea)
Korean artist Daehyun Kim, better known as Moonassi, is the author of a series of beautiful and intriguing black and white drawings. By mixing surreal and figurative imagery, Daehyun creates a voyage exploring human conditions and situation with a simple yet very unique way. Two year after his fist feature on Artchipel, we catch up with Artist to chat with us about his story, creative process and future projects.
Artchipel: Hi Daehyun, tell us about your education background and your practice.Daehyun Kim: I was born in Seoul, South Korea in 1980. I majored in Oriental Painting. The word “Oriental” could make you confused. It’s actually a study of the old East Asian painting where I learned about related skills such as Ink wash painting, but also ancient East Asian philosophies and aesthetics.
A: You have been working on Moonassi drawing series since 2008. What does Moonassi mean?DK: Moonassi is my artist name that I’ve been using since long ago. It was “무나 moonaa” at the beginning and has become “무나씨 moona-ssi” as people get used to the name. (“-씨 -ssi” is the most commonly used honorific forms of address in Korean, used amongst people of approximately equal speech level. It is attached at the end of the full name or simply after the first name if the speaker is more familiar with someone.) 
“무나 moonaa” can be roughly translated as “There is no such thing as me”, or “Emptiness / Void in me”. When people call me “Moonassi”, it’s like if they are calling someone who has no identity. Isn’t it interesting?
A: You have a very distinctive identity. Could you share with us your creative process and how did you come to develop your aesthetic?DK: At the beginning, I’ve never thought that my drawing is unique. But the more I draw, the more it became something special naturally. I just focused on what I really can draw, what I really want to draw, and what I prefer to use. The process is always changing. Usually I start with just a simple image that flashes across my mind, but sometimes I just concentrate on the subject or a word that I want to express. It’s almost like translating words into images.
A: You often put on stage one or several human figures with a very similar look, we can hardly identify their gender or age! Yet each of them seems to have a strong spirit and imparts a universal message to human hearts. Tell us a bit about these intriguing characters.DK: The face with no expression actually is borrowed from old buddies painting which has always fascinated me since University. I thought that the face is perfect to conceal their feelings, because I don’t want to show directly if this guy is good or bad through their faces. The black simple suit that looks like underwear has been chosen to make you only focus on their gesture. I purposely don’t show the time, region or gender. 
A: Do you have special rituals to get into creating mood?  DK: Yeah I used to believe that there must be some special rituals to be able to create. For example, pushing myself into extremely bad or sad mood, sitting on the desk all night doing nothing like a zombie until something comes up in my mind, and so on. But now I’m trying to ignore these bad rituals. Somehow, now I can draw when I want to do. And I’m so happy that I can draw even during the daytime.
A: Which artists have inspired you the most?DK: Interestingly, I’ve never got inspired by any contemporary artist. I’m more inspired by writings, songs and videos. I collect lots of images, songs and videos from Internet, but unfortunately, I forget easily artist’s names or artwork titles. 
A: What has been your strongest memory to date as an artist?DK: Sometimes, people send me a photo of his/her having my drawing tattooed on their skin. It’s really strange and beautiful to see my drawing on someone else’s body.
A: What is your project for the upcoming year?DK: Making a new picture book, selling prints, hiking mountains and partying with friends more often, working less in the office and drawing more in my studio!
Thanks Daehyun for taking the time to answer the questions. Daehyun Kim can be found with updated posts on his Website and Facebook. His book Anonymous Drawing is available for purchase on Studiofnt.
[more Daehyun Kim aka Moonassi | Art Writer’s Wednesday with Artchipel]
  • Art Writer’s Wednesday 18 
Daehyun Kim aka Moonassi (b.1980, South Korea)
Korean artist Daehyun Kim, better known as Moonassi, is the author of a series of beautiful and intriguing black and white drawings. By mixing surreal and figurative imagery, Daehyun creates a voyage exploring human conditions and situation with a simple yet very unique way. Two year after his fist feature on Artchipel, we catch up with Artist to chat with us about his story, creative process and future projects.
Artchipel: Hi Daehyun, tell us about your education background and your practice.Daehyun Kim: I was born in Seoul, South Korea in 1980. I majored in Oriental Painting. The word “Oriental” could make you confused. It’s actually a study of the old East Asian painting where I learned about related skills such as Ink wash painting, but also ancient East Asian philosophies and aesthetics.
A: You have been working on Moonassi drawing series since 2008. What does Moonassi mean?DK: Moonassi is my artist name that I’ve been using since long ago. It was “무나 moonaa” at the beginning and has become “무나씨 moona-ssi” as people get used to the name. (“-씨 -ssi” is the most commonly used honorific forms of address in Korean, used amongst people of approximately equal speech level. It is attached at the end of the full name or simply after the first name if the speaker is more familiar with someone.) 
“무나 moonaa” can be roughly translated as “There is no such thing as me”, or “Emptiness / Void in me”. When people call me “Moonassi”, it’s like if they are calling someone who has no identity. Isn’t it interesting?
A: You have a very distinctive identity. Could you share with us your creative process and how did you come to develop your aesthetic?DK: At the beginning, I’ve never thought that my drawing is unique. But the more I draw, the more it became something special naturally. I just focused on what I really can draw, what I really want to draw, and what I prefer to use. The process is always changing. Usually I start with just a simple image that flashes across my mind, but sometimes I just concentrate on the subject or a word that I want to express. It’s almost like translating words into images.
A: You often put on stage one or several human figures with a very similar look, we can hardly identify their gender or age! Yet each of them seems to have a strong spirit and imparts a universal message to human hearts. Tell us a bit about these intriguing characters.DK: The face with no expression actually is borrowed from old buddies painting which has always fascinated me since University. I thought that the face is perfect to conceal their feelings, because I don’t want to show directly if this guy is good or bad through their faces. The black simple suit that looks like underwear has been chosen to make you only focus on their gesture. I purposely don’t show the time, region or gender. 
A: Do you have special rituals to get into creating mood?  DK: Yeah I used to believe that there must be some special rituals to be able to create. For example, pushing myself into extremely bad or sad mood, sitting on the desk all night doing nothing like a zombie until something comes up in my mind, and so on. But now I’m trying to ignore these bad rituals. Somehow, now I can draw when I want to do. And I’m so happy that I can draw even during the daytime.
A: Which artists have inspired you the most?DK: Interestingly, I’ve never got inspired by any contemporary artist. I’m more inspired by writings, songs and videos. I collect lots of images, songs and videos from Internet, but unfortunately, I forget easily artist’s names or artwork titles. 
A: What has been your strongest memory to date as an artist?DK: Sometimes, people send me a photo of his/her having my drawing tattooed on their skin. It’s really strange and beautiful to see my drawing on someone else’s body.
A: What is your project for the upcoming year?DK: Making a new picture book, selling prints, hiking mountains and partying with friends more often, working less in the office and drawing more in my studio!
Thanks Daehyun for taking the time to answer the questions. Daehyun Kim can be found with updated posts on his Website and Facebook. His book Anonymous Drawing is available for purchase on Studiofnt.
[more Daehyun Kim aka Moonassi | Art Writer’s Wednesday with Artchipel]
  • Art Writer’s Wednesday 18 
Daehyun Kim aka Moonassi (b.1980, South Korea)
Korean artist Daehyun Kim, better known as Moonassi, is the author of a series of beautiful and intriguing black and white drawings. By mixing surreal and figurative imagery, Daehyun creates a voyage exploring human conditions and situation with a simple yet very unique way. Two year after his fist feature on Artchipel, we catch up with Artist to chat with us about his story, creative process and future projects.
Artchipel: Hi Daehyun, tell us about your education background and your practice.Daehyun Kim: I was born in Seoul, South Korea in 1980. I majored in Oriental Painting. The word “Oriental” could make you confused. It’s actually a study of the old East Asian painting where I learned about related skills such as Ink wash painting, but also ancient East Asian philosophies and aesthetics.
A: You have been working on Moonassi drawing series since 2008. What does Moonassi mean?DK: Moonassi is my artist name that I’ve been using since long ago. It was “무나 moonaa” at the beginning and has become “무나씨 moona-ssi” as people get used to the name. (“-씨 -ssi” is the most commonly used honorific forms of address in Korean, used amongst people of approximately equal speech level. It is attached at the end of the full name or simply after the first name if the speaker is more familiar with someone.) 
“무나 moonaa” can be roughly translated as “There is no such thing as me”, or “Emptiness / Void in me”. When people call me “Moonassi”, it’s like if they are calling someone who has no identity. Isn’t it interesting?
A: You have a very distinctive identity. Could you share with us your creative process and how did you come to develop your aesthetic?DK: At the beginning, I’ve never thought that my drawing is unique. But the more I draw, the more it became something special naturally. I just focused on what I really can draw, what I really want to draw, and what I prefer to use. The process is always changing. Usually I start with just a simple image that flashes across my mind, but sometimes I just concentrate on the subject or a word that I want to express. It’s almost like translating words into images.
A: You often put on stage one or several human figures with a very similar look, we can hardly identify their gender or age! Yet each of them seems to have a strong spirit and imparts a universal message to human hearts. Tell us a bit about these intriguing characters.DK: The face with no expression actually is borrowed from old buddies painting which has always fascinated me since University. I thought that the face is perfect to conceal their feelings, because I don’t want to show directly if this guy is good or bad through their faces. The black simple suit that looks like underwear has been chosen to make you only focus on their gesture. I purposely don’t show the time, region or gender. 
A: Do you have special rituals to get into creating mood?  DK: Yeah I used to believe that there must be some special rituals to be able to create. For example, pushing myself into extremely bad or sad mood, sitting on the desk all night doing nothing like a zombie until something comes up in my mind, and so on. But now I’m trying to ignore these bad rituals. Somehow, now I can draw when I want to do. And I’m so happy that I can draw even during the daytime.
A: Which artists have inspired you the most?DK: Interestingly, I’ve never got inspired by any contemporary artist. I’m more inspired by writings, songs and videos. I collect lots of images, songs and videos from Internet, but unfortunately, I forget easily artist’s names or artwork titles. 
A: What has been your strongest memory to date as an artist?DK: Sometimes, people send me a photo of his/her having my drawing tattooed on their skin. It’s really strange and beautiful to see my drawing on someone else’s body.
A: What is your project for the upcoming year?DK: Making a new picture book, selling prints, hiking mountains and partying with friends more often, working less in the office and drawing more in my studio!
Thanks Daehyun for taking the time to answer the questions. Daehyun Kim can be found with updated posts on his Website and Facebook. His book Anonymous Drawing is available for purchase on Studiofnt.
[more Daehyun Kim aka Moonassi | Art Writer’s Wednesday with Artchipel]
Art Writer’s Wednesday 18 
Daehyun Kim aka Moonassi (b.1980, South Korea)
Korean artist Daehyun Kim, better known as Moonassi, is the author of a series of beautiful and intriguing black and white drawings. By mixing surreal and figurative imagery, Daehyun creates a voyage exploring human conditions and situation with a simple yet very unique way. Two year after his fist feature on Artchipel, we catch up with Artist to chat with us about his story, creative process and future projects.
Artchipel: Hi Daehyun, tell us about your education background and your practice.Daehyun Kim: I was born in Seoul, South Korea in 1980. I majored in Oriental Painting. The word “Oriental” could make you confused. It’s actually a study of the old East Asian painting where I learned about related skills such as Ink wash painting, but also ancient East Asian philosophies and aesthetics.
A: You have been working on Moonassi drawing series since 2008. What does Moonassi mean?DK: Moonassi is my artist name that I’ve been using since long ago. It was “무나 moonaa” at the beginning and has become “무나씨 moona-ssi” as people get used to the name. (“-씨 -ssi” is the most commonly used honorific forms of address in Korean, used amongst people of approximately equal speech level. It is attached at the end of the full name or simply after the first name if the speaker is more familiar with someone.) 
“무나 moonaa” can be roughly translated as “There is no such thing as me”, or “Emptiness / Void in me”. When people call me “Moonassi”, it’s like if they are calling someone who has no identity. Isn’t it interesting?
A: You have a very distinctive identity. Could you share with us your creative process and how did you come to develop your aesthetic?DK: At the beginning, I’ve never thought that my drawing is unique. But the more I draw, the more it became something special naturally. I just focused on what I really can draw, what I really want to draw, and what I prefer to use. The process is always changing. Usually I start with just a simple image that flashes across my mind, but sometimes I just concentrate on the subject or a word that I want to express. It’s almost like translating words into images.
A: You often put on stage one or several human figures with a very similar look, we can hardly identify their gender or age! Yet each of them seems to have a strong spirit and imparts a universal message to human hearts. Tell us a bit about these intriguing characters.DK: The face with no expression actually is borrowed from old buddies painting which has always fascinated me since University. I thought that the face is perfect to conceal their feelings, because I don’t want to show directly if this guy is good or bad through their faces. The black simple suit that looks like underwear has been chosen to make you only focus on their gesture. I purposely don’t show the time, region or gender. 
A: Do you have special rituals to get into creating mood?  DK: Yeah I used to believe that there must be some special rituals to be able to create. For example, pushing myself into extremely bad or sad mood, sitting on the desk all night doing nothing like a zombie until something comes up in my mind, and so on. But now I’m trying to ignore these bad rituals. Somehow, now I can draw when I want to do. And I’m so happy that I can draw even during the daytime.
A: Which artists have inspired you the most?DK: Interestingly, I’ve never got inspired by any contemporary artist. I’m more inspired by writings, songs and videos. I collect lots of images, songs and videos from Internet, but unfortunately, I forget easily artist’s names or artwork titles. 
A: What has been your strongest memory to date as an artist?DK: Sometimes, people send me a photo of his/her having my drawing tattooed on their skin. It’s really strange and beautiful to see my drawing on someone else’s body.
A: What is your project for the upcoming year?DK: Making a new picture book, selling prints, hiking mountains and partying with friends more often, working less in the office and drawing more in my studio!
Thanks Daehyun for taking the time to answer the questions. Daehyun Kim can be found with updated posts on his Website and Facebook. His book Anonymous Drawing is available for purchase on Studiofnt.
[more Daehyun Kim aka Moonassi | Art Writer’s Wednesday with Artchipel] Art Writer’s Wednesday 18 
Daehyun Kim aka Moonassi (b.1980, South Korea)
Korean artist Daehyun Kim, better known as Moonassi, is the author of a series of beautiful and intriguing black and white drawings. By mixing surreal and figurative imagery, Daehyun creates a voyage exploring human conditions and situation with a simple yet very unique way. Two year after his fist feature on Artchipel, we catch up with Artist to chat with us about his story, creative process and future projects.
Artchipel: Hi Daehyun, tell us about your education background and your practice.Daehyun Kim: I was born in Seoul, South Korea in 1980. I majored in Oriental Painting. The word “Oriental” could make you confused. It’s actually a study of the old East Asian painting where I learned about related skills such as Ink wash painting, but also ancient East Asian philosophies and aesthetics.
A: You have been working on Moonassi drawing series since 2008. What does Moonassi mean?DK: Moonassi is my artist name that I’ve been using since long ago. It was “무나 moonaa” at the beginning and has become “무나씨 moona-ssi” as people get used to the name. (“-씨 -ssi” is the most commonly used honorific forms of address in Korean, used amongst people of approximately equal speech level. It is attached at the end of the full name or simply after the first name if the speaker is more familiar with someone.) 
“무나 moonaa” can be roughly translated as “There is no such thing as me”, or “Emptiness / Void in me”. When people call me “Moonassi”, it’s like if they are calling someone who has no identity. Isn’t it interesting?
A: You have a very distinctive identity. Could you share with us your creative process and how did you come to develop your aesthetic?DK: At the beginning, I’ve never thought that my drawing is unique. But the more I draw, the more it became something special naturally. I just focused on what I really can draw, what I really want to draw, and what I prefer to use. The process is always changing. Usually I start with just a simple image that flashes across my mind, but sometimes I just concentrate on the subject or a word that I want to express. It’s almost like translating words into images.
A: You often put on stage one or several human figures with a very similar look, we can hardly identify their gender or age! Yet each of them seems to have a strong spirit and imparts a universal message to human hearts. Tell us a bit about these intriguing characters.DK: The face with no expression actually is borrowed from old buddies painting which has always fascinated me since University. I thought that the face is perfect to conceal their feelings, because I don’t want to show directly if this guy is good or bad through their faces. The black simple suit that looks like underwear has been chosen to make you only focus on their gesture. I purposely don’t show the time, region or gender. 
A: Do you have special rituals to get into creating mood?  DK: Yeah I used to believe that there must be some special rituals to be able to create. For example, pushing myself into extremely bad or sad mood, sitting on the desk all night doing nothing like a zombie until something comes up in my mind, and so on. But now I’m trying to ignore these bad rituals. Somehow, now I can draw when I want to do. And I’m so happy that I can draw even during the daytime.
A: Which artists have inspired you the most?DK: Interestingly, I’ve never got inspired by any contemporary artist. I’m more inspired by writings, songs and videos. I collect lots of images, songs and videos from Internet, but unfortunately, I forget easily artist’s names or artwork titles. 
A: What has been your strongest memory to date as an artist?DK: Sometimes, people send me a photo of his/her having my drawing tattooed on their skin. It’s really strange and beautiful to see my drawing on someone else’s body.
A: What is your project for the upcoming year?DK: Making a new picture book, selling prints, hiking mountains and partying with friends more often, working less in the office and drawing more in my studio!
Thanks Daehyun for taking the time to answer the questions. Daehyun Kim can be found with updated posts on his Website and Facebook. His book Anonymous Drawing is available for purchase on Studiofnt.
[more Daehyun Kim aka Moonassi | Art Writer’s Wednesday with Artchipel] Art Writer’s Wednesday 18 
Daehyun Kim aka Moonassi (b.1980, South Korea)
Korean artist Daehyun Kim, better known as Moonassi, is the author of a series of beautiful and intriguing black and white drawings. By mixing surreal and figurative imagery, Daehyun creates a voyage exploring human conditions and situation with a simple yet very unique way. Two year after his fist feature on Artchipel, we catch up with Artist to chat with us about his story, creative process and future projects.
Artchipel: Hi Daehyun, tell us about your education background and your practice.Daehyun Kim: I was born in Seoul, South Korea in 1980. I majored in Oriental Painting. The word “Oriental” could make you confused. It’s actually a study of the old East Asian painting where I learned about related skills such as Ink wash painting, but also ancient East Asian philosophies and aesthetics.
A: You have been working on Moonassi drawing series since 2008. What does Moonassi mean?DK: Moonassi is my artist name that I’ve been using since long ago. It was “무나 moonaa” at the beginning and has become “무나씨 moona-ssi” as people get used to the name. (“-씨 -ssi” is the most commonly used honorific forms of address in Korean, used amongst people of approximately equal speech level. It is attached at the end of the full name or simply after the first name if the speaker is more familiar with someone.) 
“무나 moonaa” can be roughly translated as “There is no such thing as me”, or “Emptiness / Void in me”. When people call me “Moonassi”, it’s like if they are calling someone who has no identity. Isn’t it interesting?
A: You have a very distinctive identity. Could you share with us your creative process and how did you come to develop your aesthetic?DK: At the beginning, I’ve never thought that my drawing is unique. But the more I draw, the more it became something special naturally. I just focused on what I really can draw, what I really want to draw, and what I prefer to use. The process is always changing. Usually I start with just a simple image that flashes across my mind, but sometimes I just concentrate on the subject or a word that I want to express. It’s almost like translating words into images.
A: You often put on stage one or several human figures with a very similar look, we can hardly identify their gender or age! Yet each of them seems to have a strong spirit and imparts a universal message to human hearts. Tell us a bit about these intriguing characters.DK: The face with no expression actually is borrowed from old buddies painting which has always fascinated me since University. I thought that the face is perfect to conceal their feelings, because I don’t want to show directly if this guy is good or bad through their faces. The black simple suit that looks like underwear has been chosen to make you only focus on their gesture. I purposely don’t show the time, region or gender. 
A: Do you have special rituals to get into creating mood?  DK: Yeah I used to believe that there must be some special rituals to be able to create. For example, pushing myself into extremely bad or sad mood, sitting on the desk all night doing nothing like a zombie until something comes up in my mind, and so on. But now I’m trying to ignore these bad rituals. Somehow, now I can draw when I want to do. And I’m so happy that I can draw even during the daytime.
A: Which artists have inspired you the most?DK: Interestingly, I’ve never got inspired by any contemporary artist. I’m more inspired by writings, songs and videos. I collect lots of images, songs and videos from Internet, but unfortunately, I forget easily artist’s names or artwork titles. 
A: What has been your strongest memory to date as an artist?DK: Sometimes, people send me a photo of his/her having my drawing tattooed on their skin. It’s really strange and beautiful to see my drawing on someone else’s body.
A: What is your project for the upcoming year?DK: Making a new picture book, selling prints, hiking mountains and partying with friends more often, working less in the office and drawing more in my studio!
Thanks Daehyun for taking the time to answer the questions. Daehyun Kim can be found with updated posts on his Website and Facebook. His book Anonymous Drawing is available for purchase on Studiofnt.
[more Daehyun Kim aka Moonassi | Art Writer’s Wednesday with Artchipel] Art Writer’s Wednesday 18 
Daehyun Kim aka Moonassi (b.1980, South Korea)
Korean artist Daehyun Kim, better known as Moonassi, is the author of a series of beautiful and intriguing black and white drawings. By mixing surreal and figurative imagery, Daehyun creates a voyage exploring human conditions and situation with a simple yet very unique way. Two year after his fist feature on Artchipel, we catch up with Artist to chat with us about his story, creative process and future projects.
Artchipel: Hi Daehyun, tell us about your education background and your practice.Daehyun Kim: I was born in Seoul, South Korea in 1980. I majored in Oriental Painting. The word “Oriental” could make you confused. It’s actually a study of the old East Asian painting where I learned about related skills such as Ink wash painting, but also ancient East Asian philosophies and aesthetics.
A: You have been working on Moonassi drawing series since 2008. What does Moonassi mean?DK: Moonassi is my artist name that I’ve been using since long ago. It was “무나 moonaa” at the beginning and has become “무나씨 moona-ssi” as people get used to the name. (“-씨 -ssi” is the most commonly used honorific forms of address in Korean, used amongst people of approximately equal speech level. It is attached at the end of the full name or simply after the first name if the speaker is more familiar with someone.) 
“무나 moonaa” can be roughly translated as “There is no such thing as me”, or “Emptiness / Void in me”. When people call me “Moonassi”, it’s like if they are calling someone who has no identity. Isn’t it interesting?
A: You have a very distinctive identity. Could you share with us your creative process and how did you come to develop your aesthetic?DK: At the beginning, I’ve never thought that my drawing is unique. But the more I draw, the more it became something special naturally. I just focused on what I really can draw, what I really want to draw, and what I prefer to use. The process is always changing. Usually I start with just a simple image that flashes across my mind, but sometimes I just concentrate on the subject or a word that I want to express. It’s almost like translating words into images.
A: You often put on stage one or several human figures with a very similar look, we can hardly identify their gender or age! Yet each of them seems to have a strong spirit and imparts a universal message to human hearts. Tell us a bit about these intriguing characters.DK: The face with no expression actually is borrowed from old buddies painting which has always fascinated me since University. I thought that the face is perfect to conceal their feelings, because I don’t want to show directly if this guy is good or bad through their faces. The black simple suit that looks like underwear has been chosen to make you only focus on their gesture. I purposely don’t show the time, region or gender. 
A: Do you have special rituals to get into creating mood?  DK: Yeah I used to believe that there must be some special rituals to be able to create. For example, pushing myself into extremely bad or sad mood, sitting on the desk all night doing nothing like a zombie until something comes up in my mind, and so on. But now I’m trying to ignore these bad rituals. Somehow, now I can draw when I want to do. And I’m so happy that I can draw even during the daytime.
A: Which artists have inspired you the most?DK: Interestingly, I’ve never got inspired by any contemporary artist. I’m more inspired by writings, songs and videos. I collect lots of images, songs and videos from Internet, but unfortunately, I forget easily artist’s names or artwork titles. 
A: What has been your strongest memory to date as an artist?DK: Sometimes, people send me a photo of his/her having my drawing tattooed on their skin. It’s really strange and beautiful to see my drawing on someone else’s body.
A: What is your project for the upcoming year?DK: Making a new picture book, selling prints, hiking mountains and partying with friends more often, working less in the office and drawing more in my studio!
Thanks Daehyun for taking the time to answer the questions. Daehyun Kim can be found with updated posts on his Website and Facebook. His book Anonymous Drawing is available for purchase on Studiofnt.
[more Daehyun Kim aka Moonassi | Art Writer’s Wednesday with Artchipel] Art Writer’s Wednesday 18 
Daehyun Kim aka Moonassi (b.1980, South Korea)
Korean artist Daehyun Kim, better known as Moonassi, is the author of a series of beautiful and intriguing black and white drawings. By mixing surreal and figurative imagery, Daehyun creates a voyage exploring human conditions and situation with a simple yet very unique way. Two year after his fist feature on Artchipel, we catch up with Artist to chat with us about his story, creative process and future projects.
Artchipel: Hi Daehyun, tell us about your education background and your practice.Daehyun Kim: I was born in Seoul, South Korea in 1980. I majored in Oriental Painting. The word “Oriental” could make you confused. It’s actually a study of the old East Asian painting where I learned about related skills such as Ink wash painting, but also ancient East Asian philosophies and aesthetics.
A: You have been working on Moonassi drawing series since 2008. What does Moonassi mean?DK: Moonassi is my artist name that I’ve been using since long ago. It was “무나 moonaa” at the beginning and has become “무나씨 moona-ssi” as people get used to the name. (“-씨 -ssi” is the most commonly used honorific forms of address in Korean, used amongst people of approximately equal speech level. It is attached at the end of the full name or simply after the first name if the speaker is more familiar with someone.) 
“무나 moonaa” can be roughly translated as “There is no such thing as me”, or “Emptiness / Void in me”. When people call me “Moonassi”, it’s like if they are calling someone who has no identity. Isn’t it interesting?
A: You have a very distinctive identity. Could you share with us your creative process and how did you come to develop your aesthetic?DK: At the beginning, I’ve never thought that my drawing is unique. But the more I draw, the more it became something special naturally. I just focused on what I really can draw, what I really want to draw, and what I prefer to use. The process is always changing. Usually I start with just a simple image that flashes across my mind, but sometimes I just concentrate on the subject or a word that I want to express. It’s almost like translating words into images.
A: You often put on stage one or several human figures with a very similar look, we can hardly identify their gender or age! Yet each of them seems to have a strong spirit and imparts a universal message to human hearts. Tell us a bit about these intriguing characters.DK: The face with no expression actually is borrowed from old buddies painting which has always fascinated me since University. I thought that the face is perfect to conceal their feelings, because I don’t want to show directly if this guy is good or bad through their faces. The black simple suit that looks like underwear has been chosen to make you only focus on their gesture. I purposely don’t show the time, region or gender. 
A: Do you have special rituals to get into creating mood?  DK: Yeah I used to believe that there must be some special rituals to be able to create. For example, pushing myself into extremely bad or sad mood, sitting on the desk all night doing nothing like a zombie until something comes up in my mind, and so on. But now I’m trying to ignore these bad rituals. Somehow, now I can draw when I want to do. And I’m so happy that I can draw even during the daytime.
A: Which artists have inspired you the most?DK: Interestingly, I’ve never got inspired by any contemporary artist. I’m more inspired by writings, songs and videos. I collect lots of images, songs and videos from Internet, but unfortunately, I forget easily artist’s names or artwork titles. 
A: What has been your strongest memory to date as an artist?DK: Sometimes, people send me a photo of his/her having my drawing tattooed on their skin. It’s really strange and beautiful to see my drawing on someone else’s body.
A: What is your project for the upcoming year?DK: Making a new picture book, selling prints, hiking mountains and partying with friends more often, working less in the office and drawing more in my studio!
Thanks Daehyun for taking the time to answer the questions. Daehyun Kim can be found with updated posts on his Website and Facebook. His book Anonymous Drawing is available for purchase on Studiofnt.
[more Daehyun Kim aka Moonassi | Art Writer’s Wednesday with Artchipel]
  • Mica Angela Hendricks aka Busy Mockingbird (USA) 
Mica Angela Hendricks is an illustrator and graphic artist working primarily in ballpoint pen and acrylics. She keeps herself very constantly busy with either real or potential projects. Also a happy mom, she started collaborating with her 4-year-old daughter Myla last year on a series of wonderful drawings: “In sharing my artwork and allowing our daughter to be an equal in our collaborations, I helped solidify her confidence, which is way more precious than any doodle I could have done. In her mind, her contributions were as valid as mine (and in truth, they really were). Most importantly, I learned that if you have a preconceived notion of how something should be, you will always be disppointed. Instead, just go with it, just accept it, because usually something even more wonderful will come out of it.” Some of their collaborative prints are available for sale here.
[more Mica Angela Hendricks | artist recommended by mumylikes]
  • Mica Angela Hendricks aka Busy Mockingbird (USA) 
Mica Angela Hendricks is an illustrator and graphic artist working primarily in ballpoint pen and acrylics. She keeps herself very constantly busy with either real or potential projects. Also a happy mom, she started collaborating with her 4-year-old daughter Myla last year on a series of wonderful drawings: “In sharing my artwork and allowing our daughter to be an equal in our collaborations, I helped solidify her confidence, which is way more precious than any doodle I could have done. In her mind, her contributions were as valid as mine (and in truth, they really were). Most importantly, I learned that if you have a preconceived notion of how something should be, you will always be disppointed. Instead, just go with it, just accept it, because usually something even more wonderful will come out of it.” Some of their collaborative prints are available for sale here.
[more Mica Angela Hendricks | artist recommended by mumylikes]
  • Mica Angela Hendricks aka Busy Mockingbird (USA) 
Mica Angela Hendricks is an illustrator and graphic artist working primarily in ballpoint pen and acrylics. She keeps herself very constantly busy with either real or potential projects. Also a happy mom, she started collaborating with her 4-year-old daughter Myla last year on a series of wonderful drawings: “In sharing my artwork and allowing our daughter to be an equal in our collaborations, I helped solidify her confidence, which is way more precious than any doodle I could have done. In her mind, her contributions were as valid as mine (and in truth, they really were). Most importantly, I learned that if you have a preconceived notion of how something should be, you will always be disppointed. Instead, just go with it, just accept it, because usually something even more wonderful will come out of it.” Some of their collaborative prints are available for sale here.
[more Mica Angela Hendricks | artist recommended by mumylikes]
  • Mica Angela Hendricks aka Busy Mockingbird (USA) 
Mica Angela Hendricks is an illustrator and graphic artist working primarily in ballpoint pen and acrylics. She keeps herself very constantly busy with either real or potential projects. Also a happy mom, she started collaborating with her 4-year-old daughter Myla last year on a series of wonderful drawings: “In sharing my artwork and allowing our daughter to be an equal in our collaborations, I helped solidify her confidence, which is way more precious than any doodle I could have done. In her mind, her contributions were as valid as mine (and in truth, they really were). Most importantly, I learned that if you have a preconceived notion of how something should be, you will always be disppointed. Instead, just go with it, just accept it, because usually something even more wonderful will come out of it.” Some of their collaborative prints are available for sale here.
[more Mica Angela Hendricks | artist recommended by mumylikes]
  • Mica Angela Hendricks aka Busy Mockingbird (USA) 
Mica Angela Hendricks is an illustrator and graphic artist working primarily in ballpoint pen and acrylics. She keeps herself very constantly busy with either real or potential projects. Also a happy mom, she started collaborating with her 4-year-old daughter Myla last year on a series of wonderful drawings: “In sharing my artwork and allowing our daughter to be an equal in our collaborations, I helped solidify her confidence, which is way more precious than any doodle I could have done. In her mind, her contributions were as valid as mine (and in truth, they really were). Most importantly, I learned that if you have a preconceived notion of how something should be, you will always be disppointed. Instead, just go with it, just accept it, because usually something even more wonderful will come out of it.” Some of their collaborative prints are available for sale here.
[more Mica Angela Hendricks | artist recommended by mumylikes]
  • Mica Angela Hendricks aka Busy Mockingbird (USA) 
Mica Angela Hendricks is an illustrator and graphic artist working primarily in ballpoint pen and acrylics. She keeps herself very constantly busy with either real or potential projects. Also a happy mom, she started collaborating with her 4-year-old daughter Myla last year on a series of wonderful drawings: “In sharing my artwork and allowing our daughter to be an equal in our collaborations, I helped solidify her confidence, which is way more precious than any doodle I could have done. In her mind, her contributions were as valid as mine (and in truth, they really were). Most importantly, I learned that if you have a preconceived notion of how something should be, you will always be disppointed. Instead, just go with it, just accept it, because usually something even more wonderful will come out of it.” Some of their collaborative prints are available for sale here.
[more Mica Angela Hendricks | artist recommended by mumylikes]
  • Mica Angela Hendricks aka Busy Mockingbird (USA) 
Mica Angela Hendricks is an illustrator and graphic artist working primarily in ballpoint pen and acrylics. She keeps herself very constantly busy with either real or potential projects. Also a happy mom, she started collaborating with her 4-year-old daughter Myla last year on a series of wonderful drawings: “In sharing my artwork and allowing our daughter to be an equal in our collaborations, I helped solidify her confidence, which is way more precious than any doodle I could have done. In her mind, her contributions were as valid as mine (and in truth, they really were). Most importantly, I learned that if you have a preconceived notion of how something should be, you will always be disppointed. Instead, just go with it, just accept it, because usually something even more wonderful will come out of it.” Some of their collaborative prints are available for sale here.
[more Mica Angela Hendricks | artist recommended by mumylikes]
  • Mica Angela Hendricks aka Busy Mockingbird (USA) 
Mica Angela Hendricks is an illustrator and graphic artist working primarily in ballpoint pen and acrylics. She keeps herself very constantly busy with either real or potential projects. Also a happy mom, she started collaborating with her 4-year-old daughter Myla last year on a series of wonderful drawings: “In sharing my artwork and allowing our daughter to be an equal in our collaborations, I helped solidify her confidence, which is way more precious than any doodle I could have done. In her mind, her contributions were as valid as mine (and in truth, they really were). Most importantly, I learned that if you have a preconceived notion of how something should be, you will always be disppointed. Instead, just go with it, just accept it, because usually something even more wonderful will come out of it.” Some of their collaborative prints are available for sale here.
[more Mica Angela Hendricks | artist recommended by mumylikes]
  • Mica Angela Hendricks aka Busy Mockingbird (USA) 
Mica Angela Hendricks is an illustrator and graphic artist working primarily in ballpoint pen and acrylics. She keeps herself very constantly busy with either real or potential projects. Also a happy mom, she started collaborating with her 4-year-old daughter Myla last year on a series of wonderful drawings: “In sharing my artwork and allowing our daughter to be an equal in our collaborations, I helped solidify her confidence, which is way more precious than any doodle I could have done. In her mind, her contributions were as valid as mine (and in truth, they really were). Most importantly, I learned that if you have a preconceived notion of how something should be, you will always be disppointed. Instead, just go with it, just accept it, because usually something even more wonderful will come out of it.” Some of their collaborative prints are available for sale here.
[more Mica Angela Hendricks | artist recommended by mumylikes]
  • Mica Angela Hendricks aka Busy Mockingbird (USA) 
Mica Angela Hendricks is an illustrator and graphic artist working primarily in ballpoint pen and acrylics. She keeps herself very constantly busy with either real or potential projects. Also a happy mom, she started collaborating with her 4-year-old daughter Myla last year on a series of wonderful drawings: “In sharing my artwork and allowing our daughter to be an equal in our collaborations, I helped solidify her confidence, which is way more precious than any doodle I could have done. In her mind, her contributions were as valid as mine (and in truth, they really were). Most importantly, I learned that if you have a preconceived notion of how something should be, you will always be disppointed. Instead, just go with it, just accept it, because usually something even more wonderful will come out of it.” Some of their collaborative prints are available for sale here.
[more Mica Angela Hendricks | artist recommended by mumylikes]
Mica Angela Hendricks aka Busy Mockingbird (USA) 
Mica Angela Hendricks is an illustrator and graphic artist working primarily in ballpoint pen and acrylics. She keeps herself very constantly busy with either real or potential projects. Also a happy mom, she started collaborating with her 4-year-old daughter Myla last year on a series of wonderful drawings: “In sharing my artwork and allowing our daughter to be an equal in our collaborations, I helped solidify her confidence, which is way more precious than any doodle I could have done. In her mind, her contributions were as valid as mine (and in truth, they really were). Most importantly, I learned that if you have a preconceived notion of how something should be, you will always be disppointed. Instead, just go with it, just accept it, because usually something even more wonderful will come out of it.” Some of their collaborative prints are available for sale here.
[more Mica Angela Hendricks | artist recommended by mumylikes] Mica Angela Hendricks aka Busy Mockingbird (USA) 
Mica Angela Hendricks is an illustrator and graphic artist working primarily in ballpoint pen and acrylics. She keeps herself very constantly busy with either real or potential projects. Also a happy mom, she started collaborating with her 4-year-old daughter Myla last year on a series of wonderful drawings: “In sharing my artwork and allowing our daughter to be an equal in our collaborations, I helped solidify her confidence, which is way more precious than any doodle I could have done. In her mind, her contributions were as valid as mine (and in truth, they really were). Most importantly, I learned that if you have a preconceived notion of how something should be, you will always be disppointed. Instead, just go with it, just accept it, because usually something even more wonderful will come out of it.” Some of their collaborative prints are available for sale here.
[more Mica Angela Hendricks | artist recommended by mumylikes] Mica Angela Hendricks aka Busy Mockingbird (USA) 
Mica Angela Hendricks is an illustrator and graphic artist working primarily in ballpoint pen and acrylics. She keeps herself very constantly busy with either real or potential projects. Also a happy mom, she started collaborating with her 4-year-old daughter Myla last year on a series of wonderful drawings: “In sharing my artwork and allowing our daughter to be an equal in our collaborations, I helped solidify her confidence, which is way more precious than any doodle I could have done. In her mind, her contributions were as valid as mine (and in truth, they really were). Most importantly, I learned that if you have a preconceived notion of how something should be, you will always be disppointed. Instead, just go with it, just accept it, because usually something even more wonderful will come out of it.” Some of their collaborative prints are available for sale here.
[more Mica Angela Hendricks | artist recommended by mumylikes] Mica Angela Hendricks aka Busy Mockingbird (USA) 
Mica Angela Hendricks is an illustrator and graphic artist working primarily in ballpoint pen and acrylics. She keeps herself very constantly busy with either real or potential projects. Also a happy mom, she started collaborating with her 4-year-old daughter Myla last year on a series of wonderful drawings: “In sharing my artwork and allowing our daughter to be an equal in our collaborations, I helped solidify her confidence, which is way more precious than any doodle I could have done. In her mind, her contributions were as valid as mine (and in truth, they really were). Most importantly, I learned that if you have a preconceived notion of how something should be, you will always be disppointed. Instead, just go with it, just accept it, because usually something even more wonderful will come out of it.” Some of their collaborative prints are available for sale here.
[more Mica Angela Hendricks | artist recommended by mumylikes] Mica Angela Hendricks aka Busy Mockingbird (USA) 
Mica Angela Hendricks is an illustrator and graphic artist working primarily in ballpoint pen and acrylics. She keeps herself very constantly busy with either real or potential projects. Also a happy mom, she started collaborating with her 4-year-old daughter Myla last year on a series of wonderful drawings: “In sharing my artwork and allowing our daughter to be an equal in our collaborations, I helped solidify her confidence, which is way more precious than any doodle I could have done. In her mind, her contributions were as valid as mine (and in truth, they really were). Most importantly, I learned that if you have a preconceived notion of how something should be, you will always be disppointed. Instead, just go with it, just accept it, because usually something even more wonderful will come out of it.” Some of their collaborative prints are available for sale here.
[more Mica Angela Hendricks | artist recommended by mumylikes]
  • Yoon Ji-Eun (b.1982, Korea/France)
The temporal aspects and the ceaseless repetition are the basic elements of Yoon Ji-Eun’s work. Her choice of wood and stratified wood as her favoured medium is not innocuous, for the passage of time is inscribed there in the superimposed layers as well as in the veining of the surface. Sometimes, a further layer of wood in the shape of mountains or rocks stands out in relief, reinforcing the impression that an element imposes itself on the drawn shapes.
The plethora of stories as well as the fascination of Yoon Ji-Eun for the banal, daily act, make one think of Flemish painting and Breughel in particular. Even in the painting where the presence of human figures is very restricted, the concept of a community of human kind, of a link to the earth, of something original reigns. The fact that wood is employed is not alien to that concept; the idea of craft, of manual labour that digs, sculpts, brands and sketches as well. The reference to folk art is not far as well, despite the sophistication of the work and the studied compositions - an art which mirrors ordinary life, that of rituals and days that resemble one another, an art which rejoices in the use of a multitude of colours, in the beauty of a piece of wood, engraved, sketched or sculpted. Wood accompanies Yoon Ji-Eun up to and into her works on paper: one finds it in the tree motif or else in the veined, wood coloured surfaces.
[more Yoon Ji-Eun | artist found at Galerie Maria Lund]
  • Yoon Ji-Eun (b.1982, Korea/France)
The temporal aspects and the ceaseless repetition are the basic elements of Yoon Ji-Eun’s work. Her choice of wood and stratified wood as her favoured medium is not innocuous, for the passage of time is inscribed there in the superimposed layers as well as in the veining of the surface. Sometimes, a further layer of wood in the shape of mountains or rocks stands out in relief, reinforcing the impression that an element imposes itself on the drawn shapes.
The plethora of stories as well as the fascination of Yoon Ji-Eun for the banal, daily act, make one think of Flemish painting and Breughel in particular. Even in the painting where the presence of human figures is very restricted, the concept of a community of human kind, of a link to the earth, of something original reigns. The fact that wood is employed is not alien to that concept; the idea of craft, of manual labour that digs, sculpts, brands and sketches as well. The reference to folk art is not far as well, despite the sophistication of the work and the studied compositions - an art which mirrors ordinary life, that of rituals and days that resemble one another, an art which rejoices in the use of a multitude of colours, in the beauty of a piece of wood, engraved, sketched or sculpted. Wood accompanies Yoon Ji-Eun up to and into her works on paper: one finds it in the tree motif or else in the veined, wood coloured surfaces.
[more Yoon Ji-Eun | artist found at Galerie Maria Lund]
  • Yoon Ji-Eun (b.1982, Korea/France)
The temporal aspects and the ceaseless repetition are the basic elements of Yoon Ji-Eun’s work. Her choice of wood and stratified wood as her favoured medium is not innocuous, for the passage of time is inscribed there in the superimposed layers as well as in the veining of the surface. Sometimes, a further layer of wood in the shape of mountains or rocks stands out in relief, reinforcing the impression that an element imposes itself on the drawn shapes.
The plethora of stories as well as the fascination of Yoon Ji-Eun for the banal, daily act, make one think of Flemish painting and Breughel in particular. Even in the painting where the presence of human figures is very restricted, the concept of a community of human kind, of a link to the earth, of something original reigns. The fact that wood is employed is not alien to that concept; the idea of craft, of manual labour that digs, sculpts, brands and sketches as well. The reference to folk art is not far as well, despite the sophistication of the work and the studied compositions - an art which mirrors ordinary life, that of rituals and days that resemble one another, an art which rejoices in the use of a multitude of colours, in the beauty of a piece of wood, engraved, sketched or sculpted. Wood accompanies Yoon Ji-Eun up to and into her works on paper: one finds it in the tree motif or else in the veined, wood coloured surfaces.
[more Yoon Ji-Eun | artist found at Galerie Maria Lund]
  • Yoon Ji-Eun (b.1982, Korea/France)
The temporal aspects and the ceaseless repetition are the basic elements of Yoon Ji-Eun’s work. Her choice of wood and stratified wood as her favoured medium is not innocuous, for the passage of time is inscribed there in the superimposed layers as well as in the veining of the surface. Sometimes, a further layer of wood in the shape of mountains or rocks stands out in relief, reinforcing the impression that an element imposes itself on the drawn shapes.
The plethora of stories as well as the fascination of Yoon Ji-Eun for the banal, daily act, make one think of Flemish painting and Breughel in particular. Even in the painting where the presence of human figures is very restricted, the concept of a community of human kind, of a link to the earth, of something original reigns. The fact that wood is employed is not alien to that concept; the idea of craft, of manual labour that digs, sculpts, brands and sketches as well. The reference to folk art is not far as well, despite the sophistication of the work and the studied compositions - an art which mirrors ordinary life, that of rituals and days that resemble one another, an art which rejoices in the use of a multitude of colours, in the beauty of a piece of wood, engraved, sketched or sculpted. Wood accompanies Yoon Ji-Eun up to and into her works on paper: one finds it in the tree motif or else in the veined, wood coloured surfaces.
[more Yoon Ji-Eun | artist found at Galerie Maria Lund]
  • Yoon Ji-Eun (b.1982, Korea/France)
The temporal aspects and the ceaseless repetition are the basic elements of Yoon Ji-Eun’s work. Her choice of wood and stratified wood as her favoured medium is not innocuous, for the passage of time is inscribed there in the superimposed layers as well as in the veining of the surface. Sometimes, a further layer of wood in the shape of mountains or rocks stands out in relief, reinforcing the impression that an element imposes itself on the drawn shapes.
The plethora of stories as well as the fascination of Yoon Ji-Eun for the banal, daily act, make one think of Flemish painting and Breughel in particular. Even in the painting where the presence of human figures is very restricted, the concept of a community of human kind, of a link to the earth, of something original reigns. The fact that wood is employed is not alien to that concept; the idea of craft, of manual labour that digs, sculpts, brands and sketches as well. The reference to folk art is not far as well, despite the sophistication of the work and the studied compositions - an art which mirrors ordinary life, that of rituals and days that resemble one another, an art which rejoices in the use of a multitude of colours, in the beauty of a piece of wood, engraved, sketched or sculpted. Wood accompanies Yoon Ji-Eun up to and into her works on paper: one finds it in the tree motif or else in the veined, wood coloured surfaces.
[more Yoon Ji-Eun | artist found at Galerie Maria Lund]
  • Yoon Ji-Eun (b.1982, Korea/France)
The temporal aspects and the ceaseless repetition are the basic elements of Yoon Ji-Eun’s work. Her choice of wood and stratified wood as her favoured medium is not innocuous, for the passage of time is inscribed there in the superimposed layers as well as in the veining of the surface. Sometimes, a further layer of wood in the shape of mountains or rocks stands out in relief, reinforcing the impression that an element imposes itself on the drawn shapes.
The plethora of stories as well as the fascination of Yoon Ji-Eun for the banal, daily act, make one think of Flemish painting and Breughel in particular. Even in the painting where the presence of human figures is very restricted, the concept of a community of human kind, of a link to the earth, of something original reigns. The fact that wood is employed is not alien to that concept; the idea of craft, of manual labour that digs, sculpts, brands and sketches as well. The reference to folk art is not far as well, despite the sophistication of the work and the studied compositions - an art which mirrors ordinary life, that of rituals and days that resemble one another, an art which rejoices in the use of a multitude of colours, in the beauty of a piece of wood, engraved, sketched or sculpted. Wood accompanies Yoon Ji-Eun up to and into her works on paper: one finds it in the tree motif or else in the veined, wood coloured surfaces.
[more Yoon Ji-Eun | artist found at Galerie Maria Lund]
  • Yoon Ji-Eun (b.1982, Korea/France)
The temporal aspects and the ceaseless repetition are the basic elements of Yoon Ji-Eun’s work. Her choice of wood and stratified wood as her favoured medium is not innocuous, for the passage of time is inscribed there in the superimposed layers as well as in the veining of the surface. Sometimes, a further layer of wood in the shape of mountains or rocks stands out in relief, reinforcing the impression that an element imposes itself on the drawn shapes.
The plethora of stories as well as the fascination of Yoon Ji-Eun for the banal, daily act, make one think of Flemish painting and Breughel in particular. Even in the painting where the presence of human figures is very restricted, the concept of a community of human kind, of a link to the earth, of something original reigns. The fact that wood is employed is not alien to that concept; the idea of craft, of manual labour that digs, sculpts, brands and sketches as well. The reference to folk art is not far as well, despite the sophistication of the work and the studied compositions - an art which mirrors ordinary life, that of rituals and days that resemble one another, an art which rejoices in the use of a multitude of colours, in the beauty of a piece of wood, engraved, sketched or sculpted. Wood accompanies Yoon Ji-Eun up to and into her works on paper: one finds it in the tree motif or else in the veined, wood coloured surfaces.
[more Yoon Ji-Eun | artist found at Galerie Maria Lund]
  • Yoon Ji-Eun (b.1982, Korea/France)
The temporal aspects and the ceaseless repetition are the basic elements of Yoon Ji-Eun’s work. Her choice of wood and stratified wood as her favoured medium is not innocuous, for the passage of time is inscribed there in the superimposed layers as well as in the veining of the surface. Sometimes, a further layer of wood in the shape of mountains or rocks stands out in relief, reinforcing the impression that an element imposes itself on the drawn shapes.
The plethora of stories as well as the fascination of Yoon Ji-Eun for the banal, daily act, make one think of Flemish painting and Breughel in particular. Even in the painting where the presence of human figures is very restricted, the concept of a community of human kind, of a link to the earth, of something original reigns. The fact that wood is employed is not alien to that concept; the idea of craft, of manual labour that digs, sculpts, brands and sketches as well. The reference to folk art is not far as well, despite the sophistication of the work and the studied compositions - an art which mirrors ordinary life, that of rituals and days that resemble one another, an art which rejoices in the use of a multitude of colours, in the beauty of a piece of wood, engraved, sketched or sculpted. Wood accompanies Yoon Ji-Eun up to and into her works on paper: one finds it in the tree motif or else in the veined, wood coloured surfaces.
[more Yoon Ji-Eun | artist found at Galerie Maria Lund]
Yoon Ji-Eun (b.1982, Korea/France)
The temporal aspects and the ceaseless repetition are the basic elements of Yoon Ji-Eun’s work. Her choice of wood and stratified wood as her favoured medium is not innocuous, for the passage of time is inscribed there in the superimposed layers as well as in the veining of the surface. Sometimes, a further layer of wood in the shape of mountains or rocks stands out in relief, reinforcing the impression that an element imposes itself on the drawn shapes.
The plethora of stories as well as the fascination of Yoon Ji-Eun for the banal, daily act, make one think of Flemish painting and Breughel in particular. Even in the painting where the presence of human figures is very restricted, the concept of a community of human kind, of a link to the earth, of something original reigns. The fact that wood is employed is not alien to that concept; the idea of craft, of manual labour that digs, sculpts, brands and sketches as well. The reference to folk art is not far as well, despite the sophistication of the work and the studied compositions - an art which mirrors ordinary life, that of rituals and days that resemble one another, an art which rejoices in the use of a multitude of colours, in the beauty of a piece of wood, engraved, sketched or sculpted. Wood accompanies Yoon Ji-Eun up to and into her works on paper: one finds it in the tree motif or else in the veined, wood coloured surfaces.
[more Yoon Ji-Eun | artist found at Galerie Maria Lund] Yoon Ji-Eun (b.1982, Korea/France)
The temporal aspects and the ceaseless repetition are the basic elements of Yoon Ji-Eun’s work. Her choice of wood and stratified wood as her favoured medium is not innocuous, for the passage of time is inscribed there in the superimposed layers as well as in the veining of the surface. Sometimes, a further layer of wood in the shape of mountains or rocks stands out in relief, reinforcing the impression that an element imposes itself on the drawn shapes.
The plethora of stories as well as the fascination of Yoon Ji-Eun for the banal, daily act, make one think of Flemish painting and Breughel in particular. Even in the painting where the presence of human figures is very restricted, the concept of a community of human kind, of a link to the earth, of something original reigns. The fact that wood is employed is not alien to that concept; the idea of craft, of manual labour that digs, sculpts, brands and sketches as well. The reference to folk art is not far as well, despite the sophistication of the work and the studied compositions - an art which mirrors ordinary life, that of rituals and days that resemble one another, an art which rejoices in the use of a multitude of colours, in the beauty of a piece of wood, engraved, sketched or sculpted. Wood accompanies Yoon Ji-Eun up to and into her works on paper: one finds it in the tree motif or else in the veined, wood coloured surfaces.
[more Yoon Ji-Eun | artist found at Galerie Maria Lund] Yoon Ji-Eun (b.1982, Korea/France)
The temporal aspects and the ceaseless repetition are the basic elements of Yoon Ji-Eun’s work. Her choice of wood and stratified wood as her favoured medium is not innocuous, for the passage of time is inscribed there in the superimposed layers as well as in the veining of the surface. Sometimes, a further layer of wood in the shape of mountains or rocks stands out in relief, reinforcing the impression that an element imposes itself on the drawn shapes.
The plethora of stories as well as the fascination of Yoon Ji-Eun for the banal, daily act, make one think of Flemish painting and Breughel in particular. Even in the painting where the presence of human figures is very restricted, the concept of a community of human kind, of a link to the earth, of something original reigns. The fact that wood is employed is not alien to that concept; the idea of craft, of manual labour that digs, sculpts, brands and sketches as well. The reference to folk art is not far as well, despite the sophistication of the work and the studied compositions - an art which mirrors ordinary life, that of rituals and days that resemble one another, an art which rejoices in the use of a multitude of colours, in the beauty of a piece of wood, engraved, sketched or sculpted. Wood accompanies Yoon Ji-Eun up to and into her works on paper: one finds it in the tree motif or else in the veined, wood coloured surfaces.
[more Yoon Ji-Eun | artist found at Galerie Maria Lund] Yoon Ji-Eun (b.1982, Korea/France)
The temporal aspects and the ceaseless repetition are the basic elements of Yoon Ji-Eun’s work. Her choice of wood and stratified wood as her favoured medium is not innocuous, for the passage of time is inscribed there in the superimposed layers as well as in the veining of the surface. Sometimes, a further layer of wood in the shape of mountains or rocks stands out in relief, reinforcing the impression that an element imposes itself on the drawn shapes.
The plethora of stories as well as the fascination of Yoon Ji-Eun for the banal, daily act, make one think of Flemish painting and Breughel in particular. Even in the painting where the presence of human figures is very restricted, the concept of a community of human kind, of a link to the earth, of something original reigns. The fact that wood is employed is not alien to that concept; the idea of craft, of manual labour that digs, sculpts, brands and sketches as well. The reference to folk art is not far as well, despite the sophistication of the work and the studied compositions - an art which mirrors ordinary life, that of rituals and days that resemble one another, an art which rejoices in the use of a multitude of colours, in the beauty of a piece of wood, engraved, sketched or sculpted. Wood accompanies Yoon Ji-Eun up to and into her works on paper: one finds it in the tree motif or else in the veined, wood coloured surfaces.
[more Yoon Ji-Eun | artist found at Galerie Maria Lund]