posts tagged: Alexander Gronsky

  • Alexander Gronsky (b.1980, Estonia/Latvia) - Mountains & Waters
Shan shui, the Chinese word for landscape, is a compound of two symbols : for mountain (山) and water (水). Being part of Ying Yang duality, water signifies emptiness and mountain stands for matter. The traditional Shan shui painting that evolved from this vision is not a representational image of a specific place or landscape, but rather a metaphor of a human journey through a constant shift between nothingness and form. Westerm concept of depicting time and space is not relevant here: point of view is moving throughout the image in search for the “angle of totality” as the essence is not visible from a single viewpoint. It is not an open window for the viewer’s eye, but an object for the viewer’s mind. Painting is regarded as a means of conveying a sense of the totality of the natural order - of the cosmos itself. The same human figure may appear in different parts of the picture, we accompany it wandering through the hills, same mountain may be shown from different sides simultaneously as it is not a moment in time, but rather a time span. These paintings are not about variety of things around, but about one thing that is always present. All of them together create a single continuous path. The path for a true landscape.
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  • Alexander Gronsky (b.1980, Estonia/Latvia) - Mountains & Waters
Shan shui, the Chinese word for landscape, is a compound of two symbols : for mountain (山) and water (水). Being part of Ying Yang duality, water signifies emptiness and mountain stands for matter. The traditional Shan shui painting that evolved from this vision is not a representational image of a specific place or landscape, but rather a metaphor of a human journey through a constant shift between nothingness and form. Westerm concept of depicting time and space is not relevant here: point of view is moving throughout the image in search for the “angle of totality” as the essence is not visible from a single viewpoint. It is not an open window for the viewer’s eye, but an object for the viewer’s mind. Painting is regarded as a means of conveying a sense of the totality of the natural order - of the cosmos itself. The same human figure may appear in different parts of the picture, we accompany it wandering through the hills, same mountain may be shown from different sides simultaneously as it is not a moment in time, but rather a time span. These paintings are not about variety of things around, but about one thing that is always present. All of them together create a single continuous path. The path for a true landscape.
[more Alexander Gronsky]
  • Alexander Gronsky (b.1980, Estonia/Latvia) - Mountains & Waters
Shan shui, the Chinese word for landscape, is a compound of two symbols : for mountain (山) and water (水). Being part of Ying Yang duality, water signifies emptiness and mountain stands for matter. The traditional Shan shui painting that evolved from this vision is not a representational image of a specific place or landscape, but rather a metaphor of a human journey through a constant shift between nothingness and form. Westerm concept of depicting time and space is not relevant here: point of view is moving throughout the image in search for the “angle of totality” as the essence is not visible from a single viewpoint. It is not an open window for the viewer’s eye, but an object for the viewer’s mind. Painting is regarded as a means of conveying a sense of the totality of the natural order - of the cosmos itself. The same human figure may appear in different parts of the picture, we accompany it wandering through the hills, same mountain may be shown from different sides simultaneously as it is not a moment in time, but rather a time span. These paintings are not about variety of things around, but about one thing that is always present. All of them together create a single continuous path. The path for a true landscape.
[more Alexander Gronsky]
  • Alexander Gronsky (b.1980, Estonia/Latvia) - Mountains & Waters
Shan shui, the Chinese word for landscape, is a compound of two symbols : for mountain (山) and water (水). Being part of Ying Yang duality, water signifies emptiness and mountain stands for matter. The traditional Shan shui painting that evolved from this vision is not a representational image of a specific place or landscape, but rather a metaphor of a human journey through a constant shift between nothingness and form. Westerm concept of depicting time and space is not relevant here: point of view is moving throughout the image in search for the “angle of totality” as the essence is not visible from a single viewpoint. It is not an open window for the viewer’s eye, but an object for the viewer’s mind. Painting is regarded as a means of conveying a sense of the totality of the natural order - of the cosmos itself. The same human figure may appear in different parts of the picture, we accompany it wandering through the hills, same mountain may be shown from different sides simultaneously as it is not a moment in time, but rather a time span. These paintings are not about variety of things around, but about one thing that is always present. All of them together create a single continuous path. The path for a true landscape.
[more Alexander Gronsky]
Alexander Gronsky (b.1980, Estonia/Latvia) - Mountains & Waters
Shan shui, the Chinese word for landscape, is a compound of two symbols : for mountain (山) and water (水). Being part of Ying Yang duality, water signifies emptiness and mountain stands for matter. The traditional Shan shui painting that evolved from this vision is not a representational image of a specific place or landscape, but rather a metaphor of a human journey through a constant shift between nothingness and form. Westerm concept of depicting time and space is not relevant here: point of view is moving throughout the image in search for the “angle of totality” as the essence is not visible from a single viewpoint. It is not an open window for the viewer’s eye, but an object for the viewer’s mind. Painting is regarded as a means of conveying a sense of the totality of the natural order - of the cosmos itself. The same human figure may appear in different parts of the picture, we accompany it wandering through the hills, same mountain may be shown from different sides simultaneously as it is not a moment in time, but rather a time span. These paintings are not about variety of things around, but about one thing that is always present. All of them together create a single continuous path. The path for a true landscape.
[more Alexander Gronsky] Alexander Gronsky (b.1980, Estonia/Latvia) - Mountains & Waters
Shan shui, the Chinese word for landscape, is a compound of two symbols : for mountain (山) and water (水). Being part of Ying Yang duality, water signifies emptiness and mountain stands for matter. The traditional Shan shui painting that evolved from this vision is not a representational image of a specific place or landscape, but rather a metaphor of a human journey through a constant shift between nothingness and form. Westerm concept of depicting time and space is not relevant here: point of view is moving throughout the image in search for the “angle of totality” as the essence is not visible from a single viewpoint. It is not an open window for the viewer’s eye, but an object for the viewer’s mind. Painting is regarded as a means of conveying a sense of the totality of the natural order - of the cosmos itself. The same human figure may appear in different parts of the picture, we accompany it wandering through the hills, same mountain may be shown from different sides simultaneously as it is not a moment in time, but rather a time span. These paintings are not about variety of things around, but about one thing that is always present. All of them together create a single continuous path. The path for a true landscape.
[more Alexander Gronsky]