• Bernhard Lang (Germany) - Aerial Views Adria
Germany-based photographer Bernhard Lang’s obsession with aerial photography began after realizing that there actually wasn’t that much of it out there—at least, not much that took the vertical perspective he liked. He was drawn to the occasional top-down photos he came across in magazines, and also thought about photography every time he boarded a plane to fly somewhere. “Looking down out of the window, I was fascinated by seeing the world—the graphic structures—from above,” he says. Eventually, Lang found himself strapped outside of an ultralight plane, hanging thousands of feet above the ground. “The first time it was a bit scary,” he says. “But at the moment I was so concentrated on looking through the camera I wasn’t scared anymore.” Like the filmmakers, Lang hopes that showing the world from a different scale might change how people see the everyday world. (src. Co.Exist) © All images courtesy of the artist
[more Bernhard Lang | via photojojo]
  • Bernhard Lang (Germany) - Aerial Views Adria
Germany-based photographer Bernhard Lang’s obsession with aerial photography began after realizing that there actually wasn’t that much of it out there—at least, not much that took the vertical perspective he liked. He was drawn to the occasional top-down photos he came across in magazines, and also thought about photography every time he boarded a plane to fly somewhere. “Looking down out of the window, I was fascinated by seeing the world—the graphic structures—from above,” he says. Eventually, Lang found himself strapped outside of an ultralight plane, hanging thousands of feet above the ground. “The first time it was a bit scary,” he says. “But at the moment I was so concentrated on looking through the camera I wasn’t scared anymore.” Like the filmmakers, Lang hopes that showing the world from a different scale might change how people see the everyday world. (src. Co.Exist) © All images courtesy of the artist
[more Bernhard Lang | via photojojo]
  • Bernhard Lang (Germany) - Aerial Views Adria
Germany-based photographer Bernhard Lang’s obsession with aerial photography began after realizing that there actually wasn’t that much of it out there—at least, not much that took the vertical perspective he liked. He was drawn to the occasional top-down photos he came across in magazines, and also thought about photography every time he boarded a plane to fly somewhere. “Looking down out of the window, I was fascinated by seeing the world—the graphic structures—from above,” he says. Eventually, Lang found himself strapped outside of an ultralight plane, hanging thousands of feet above the ground. “The first time it was a bit scary,” he says. “But at the moment I was so concentrated on looking through the camera I wasn’t scared anymore.” Like the filmmakers, Lang hopes that showing the world from a different scale might change how people see the everyday world. (src. Co.Exist) © All images courtesy of the artist
[more Bernhard Lang | via photojojo]
  • Bernhard Lang (Germany) - Aerial Views Adria
Germany-based photographer Bernhard Lang’s obsession with aerial photography began after realizing that there actually wasn’t that much of it out there—at least, not much that took the vertical perspective he liked. He was drawn to the occasional top-down photos he came across in magazines, and also thought about photography every time he boarded a plane to fly somewhere. “Looking down out of the window, I was fascinated by seeing the world—the graphic structures—from above,” he says. Eventually, Lang found himself strapped outside of an ultralight plane, hanging thousands of feet above the ground. “The first time it was a bit scary,” he says. “But at the moment I was so concentrated on looking through the camera I wasn’t scared anymore.” Like the filmmakers, Lang hopes that showing the world from a different scale might change how people see the everyday world. (src. Co.Exist) © All images courtesy of the artist
[more Bernhard Lang | via photojojo]
  • Bernhard Lang (Germany) - Aerial Views Adria
Germany-based photographer Bernhard Lang’s obsession with aerial photography began after realizing that there actually wasn’t that much of it out there—at least, not much that took the vertical perspective he liked. He was drawn to the occasional top-down photos he came across in magazines, and also thought about photography every time he boarded a plane to fly somewhere. “Looking down out of the window, I was fascinated by seeing the world—the graphic structures—from above,” he says. Eventually, Lang found himself strapped outside of an ultralight plane, hanging thousands of feet above the ground. “The first time it was a bit scary,” he says. “But at the moment I was so concentrated on looking through the camera I wasn’t scared anymore.” Like the filmmakers, Lang hopes that showing the world from a different scale might change how people see the everyday world. (src. Co.Exist) © All images courtesy of the artist
[more Bernhard Lang | via photojojo]
  • Bernhard Lang (Germany) - Aerial Views Adria
Germany-based photographer Bernhard Lang’s obsession with aerial photography began after realizing that there actually wasn’t that much of it out there—at least, not much that took the vertical perspective he liked. He was drawn to the occasional top-down photos he came across in magazines, and also thought about photography every time he boarded a plane to fly somewhere. “Looking down out of the window, I was fascinated by seeing the world—the graphic structures—from above,” he says. Eventually, Lang found himself strapped outside of an ultralight plane, hanging thousands of feet above the ground. “The first time it was a bit scary,” he says. “But at the moment I was so concentrated on looking through the camera I wasn’t scared anymore.” Like the filmmakers, Lang hopes that showing the world from a different scale might change how people see the everyday world. (src. Co.Exist) © All images courtesy of the artist
[more Bernhard Lang | via photojojo]
  • Bernhard Lang (Germany) - Aerial Views Adria
Germany-based photographer Bernhard Lang’s obsession with aerial photography began after realizing that there actually wasn’t that much of it out there—at least, not much that took the vertical perspective he liked. He was drawn to the occasional top-down photos he came across in magazines, and also thought about photography every time he boarded a plane to fly somewhere. “Looking down out of the window, I was fascinated by seeing the world—the graphic structures—from above,” he says. Eventually, Lang found himself strapped outside of an ultralight plane, hanging thousands of feet above the ground. “The first time it was a bit scary,” he says. “But at the moment I was so concentrated on looking through the camera I wasn’t scared anymore.” Like the filmmakers, Lang hopes that showing the world from a different scale might change how people see the everyday world. (src. Co.Exist) © All images courtesy of the artist
[more Bernhard Lang | via photojojo]
  • Bernhard Lang (Germany) - Aerial Views Adria
Germany-based photographer Bernhard Lang’s obsession with aerial photography began after realizing that there actually wasn’t that much of it out there—at least, not much that took the vertical perspective he liked. He was drawn to the occasional top-down photos he came across in magazines, and also thought about photography every time he boarded a plane to fly somewhere. “Looking down out of the window, I was fascinated by seeing the world—the graphic structures—from above,” he says. Eventually, Lang found himself strapped outside of an ultralight plane, hanging thousands of feet above the ground. “The first time it was a bit scary,” he says. “But at the moment I was so concentrated on looking through the camera I wasn’t scared anymore.” Like the filmmakers, Lang hopes that showing the world from a different scale might change how people see the everyday world. (src. Co.Exist) © All images courtesy of the artist
[more Bernhard Lang | via photojojo]
  • Bernhard Lang (Germany) - Aerial Views Adria
Germany-based photographer Bernhard Lang’s obsession with aerial photography began after realizing that there actually wasn’t that much of it out there—at least, not much that took the vertical perspective he liked. He was drawn to the occasional top-down photos he came across in magazines, and also thought about photography every time he boarded a plane to fly somewhere. “Looking down out of the window, I was fascinated by seeing the world—the graphic structures—from above,” he says. Eventually, Lang found himself strapped outside of an ultralight plane, hanging thousands of feet above the ground. “The first time it was a bit scary,” he says. “But at the moment I was so concentrated on looking through the camera I wasn’t scared anymore.” Like the filmmakers, Lang hopes that showing the world from a different scale might change how people see the everyday world. (src. Co.Exist) © All images courtesy of the artist
[more Bernhard Lang | via photojojo]
  • Bernhard Lang (Germany) - Aerial Views Adria
Germany-based photographer Bernhard Lang’s obsession with aerial photography began after realizing that there actually wasn’t that much of it out there—at least, not much that took the vertical perspective he liked. He was drawn to the occasional top-down photos he came across in magazines, and also thought about photography every time he boarded a plane to fly somewhere. “Looking down out of the window, I was fascinated by seeing the world—the graphic structures—from above,” he says. Eventually, Lang found himself strapped outside of an ultralight plane, hanging thousands of feet above the ground. “The first time it was a bit scary,” he says. “But at the moment I was so concentrated on looking through the camera I wasn’t scared anymore.” Like the filmmakers, Lang hopes that showing the world from a different scale might change how people see the everyday world. (src. Co.Exist) © All images courtesy of the artist
[more Bernhard Lang | via photojojo]
Bernhard Lang (Germany) - Aerial Views Adria
Germany-based photographer Bernhard Lang’s obsession with aerial photography began after realizing that there actually wasn’t that much of it out there—at least, not much that took the vertical perspective he liked. He was drawn to the occasional top-down photos he came across in magazines, and also thought about photography every time he boarded a plane to fly somewhere. “Looking down out of the window, I was fascinated by seeing the world—the graphic structures—from above,” he says. Eventually, Lang found himself strapped outside of an ultralight plane, hanging thousands of feet above the ground. “The first time it was a bit scary,” he says. “But at the moment I was so concentrated on looking through the camera I wasn’t scared anymore.” Like the filmmakers, Lang hopes that showing the world from a different scale might change how people see the everyday world. (src. Co.Exist) © All images courtesy of the artist
[more Bernhard Lang | via photojojo] Bernhard Lang (Germany) - Aerial Views Adria
Germany-based photographer Bernhard Lang’s obsession with aerial photography began after realizing that there actually wasn’t that much of it out there—at least, not much that took the vertical perspective he liked. He was drawn to the occasional top-down photos he came across in magazines, and also thought about photography every time he boarded a plane to fly somewhere. “Looking down out of the window, I was fascinated by seeing the world—the graphic structures—from above,” he says. Eventually, Lang found himself strapped outside of an ultralight plane, hanging thousands of feet above the ground. “The first time it was a bit scary,” he says. “But at the moment I was so concentrated on looking through the camera I wasn’t scared anymore.” Like the filmmakers, Lang hopes that showing the world from a different scale might change how people see the everyday world. (src. Co.Exist) © All images courtesy of the artist
[more Bernhard Lang | via photojojo] Bernhard Lang (Germany) - Aerial Views Adria
Germany-based photographer Bernhard Lang’s obsession with aerial photography began after realizing that there actually wasn’t that much of it out there—at least, not much that took the vertical perspective he liked. He was drawn to the occasional top-down photos he came across in magazines, and also thought about photography every time he boarded a plane to fly somewhere. “Looking down out of the window, I was fascinated by seeing the world—the graphic structures—from above,” he says. Eventually, Lang found himself strapped outside of an ultralight plane, hanging thousands of feet above the ground. “The first time it was a bit scary,” he says. “But at the moment I was so concentrated on looking through the camera I wasn’t scared anymore.” Like the filmmakers, Lang hopes that showing the world from a different scale might change how people see the everyday world. (src. Co.Exist) © All images courtesy of the artist
[more Bernhard Lang | via photojojo] Bernhard Lang (Germany) - Aerial Views Adria
Germany-based photographer Bernhard Lang’s obsession with aerial photography began after realizing that there actually wasn’t that much of it out there—at least, not much that took the vertical perspective he liked. He was drawn to the occasional top-down photos he came across in magazines, and also thought about photography every time he boarded a plane to fly somewhere. “Looking down out of the window, I was fascinated by seeing the world—the graphic structures—from above,” he says. Eventually, Lang found himself strapped outside of an ultralight plane, hanging thousands of feet above the ground. “The first time it was a bit scary,” he says. “But at the moment I was so concentrated on looking through the camera I wasn’t scared anymore.” Like the filmmakers, Lang hopes that showing the world from a different scale might change how people see the everyday world. (src. Co.Exist) © All images courtesy of the artist
[more Bernhard Lang | via photojojo] Bernhard Lang (Germany) - Aerial Views Adria
Germany-based photographer Bernhard Lang’s obsession with aerial photography began after realizing that there actually wasn’t that much of it out there—at least, not much that took the vertical perspective he liked. He was drawn to the occasional top-down photos he came across in magazines, and also thought about photography every time he boarded a plane to fly somewhere. “Looking down out of the window, I was fascinated by seeing the world—the graphic structures—from above,” he says. Eventually, Lang found himself strapped outside of an ultralight plane, hanging thousands of feet above the ground. “The first time it was a bit scary,” he says. “But at the moment I was so concentrated on looking through the camera I wasn’t scared anymore.” Like the filmmakers, Lang hopes that showing the world from a different scale might change how people see the everyday world. (src. Co.Exist) © All images courtesy of the artist
[more Bernhard Lang | via photojojo]
  • Joseba Elorza
New ScientistLos Angeles MagazineInvasion
  • Joseba Elorza
New ScientistLos Angeles MagazineInvasion
  • Joseba Elorza
New ScientistLos Angeles MagazineInvasion
  • Joseba Elorza
New ScientistLos Angeles MagazineInvasion
  • Joseba Elorza
New ScientistLos Angeles MagazineInvasion
  • Joseba Elorza
New ScientistLos Angeles MagazineInvasion
  • Joseba Elorza
New ScientistLos Angeles MagazineInvasion
  • Joseba Elorza
New ScientistLos Angeles MagazineInvasion
  • Joseba Elorza
New ScientistLos Angeles MagazineInvasion
  • Joseba Elorza
New ScientistLos Angeles MagazineInvasion
Joseba Elorza
New ScientistLos Angeles MagazineInvasion Joseba Elorza
New ScientistLos Angeles MagazineInvasion Joseba Elorza
New ScientistLos Angeles MagazineInvasion Joseba Elorza
New ScientistLos Angeles MagazineInvasion Joseba Elorza
New ScientistLos Angeles MagazineInvasion
  • Joseba Elorza (Spain)
Spanish illustrator and artist Joseba Elorza studied to become sound technician and later spent a couple of unfruitful years in art school. It was all this synesthesic hodgepodge where MiraRuido (Mira = look, see; Ruido = noise) sprang from. Today, the former sound thechnician makes a living with his unique digital collages, blended with humor, fantasy, sci-fi and surrealism. © All images courtesy of the artist
[more Joseba Elorza]
  • Joseba Elorza (Spain)
Spanish illustrator and artist Joseba Elorza studied to become sound technician and later spent a couple of unfruitful years in art school. It was all this synesthesic hodgepodge where MiraRuido (Mira = look, see; Ruido = noise) sprang from. Today, the former sound thechnician makes a living with his unique digital collages, blended with humor, fantasy, sci-fi and surrealism. © All images courtesy of the artist
[more Joseba Elorza]
  • Joseba Elorza (Spain)
Spanish illustrator and artist Joseba Elorza studied to become sound technician and later spent a couple of unfruitful years in art school. It was all this synesthesic hodgepodge where MiraRuido (Mira = look, see; Ruido = noise) sprang from. Today, the former sound thechnician makes a living with his unique digital collages, blended with humor, fantasy, sci-fi and surrealism. © All images courtesy of the artist
[more Joseba Elorza]
  • Joseba Elorza (Spain)
Spanish illustrator and artist Joseba Elorza studied to become sound technician and later spent a couple of unfruitful years in art school. It was all this synesthesic hodgepodge where MiraRuido (Mira = look, see; Ruido = noise) sprang from. Today, the former sound thechnician makes a living with his unique digital collages, blended with humor, fantasy, sci-fi and surrealism. © All images courtesy of the artist
[more Joseba Elorza]
  • Joseba Elorza (Spain)
Spanish illustrator and artist Joseba Elorza studied to become sound technician and later spent a couple of unfruitful years in art school. It was all this synesthesic hodgepodge where MiraRuido (Mira = look, see; Ruido = noise) sprang from. Today, the former sound thechnician makes a living with his unique digital collages, blended with humor, fantasy, sci-fi and surrealism. © All images courtesy of the artist
[more Joseba Elorza]
  • Joseba Elorza (Spain)
Spanish illustrator and artist Joseba Elorza studied to become sound technician and later spent a couple of unfruitful years in art school. It was all this synesthesic hodgepodge where MiraRuido (Mira = look, see; Ruido = noise) sprang from. Today, the former sound thechnician makes a living with his unique digital collages, blended with humor, fantasy, sci-fi and surrealism. © All images courtesy of the artist
[more Joseba Elorza]
  • Joseba Elorza (Spain)
Spanish illustrator and artist Joseba Elorza studied to become sound technician and later spent a couple of unfruitful years in art school. It was all this synesthesic hodgepodge where MiraRuido (Mira = look, see; Ruido = noise) sprang from. Today, the former sound thechnician makes a living with his unique digital collages, blended with humor, fantasy, sci-fi and surrealism. © All images courtesy of the artist
[more Joseba Elorza]
  • Joseba Elorza (Spain)
Spanish illustrator and artist Joseba Elorza studied to become sound technician and later spent a couple of unfruitful years in art school. It was all this synesthesic hodgepodge where MiraRuido (Mira = look, see; Ruido = noise) sprang from. Today, the former sound thechnician makes a living with his unique digital collages, blended with humor, fantasy, sci-fi and surrealism. © All images courtesy of the artist
[more Joseba Elorza]
  • Joseba Elorza (Spain)
Spanish illustrator and artist Joseba Elorza studied to become sound technician and later spent a couple of unfruitful years in art school. It was all this synesthesic hodgepodge where MiraRuido (Mira = look, see; Ruido = noise) sprang from. Today, the former sound thechnician makes a living with his unique digital collages, blended with humor, fantasy, sci-fi and surrealism. © All images courtesy of the artist
[more Joseba Elorza]
  • Joseba Elorza (Spain)
Spanish illustrator and artist Joseba Elorza studied to become sound technician and later spent a couple of unfruitful years in art school. It was all this synesthesic hodgepodge where MiraRuido (Mira = look, see; Ruido = noise) sprang from. Today, the former sound thechnician makes a living with his unique digital collages, blended with humor, fantasy, sci-fi and surrealism. © All images courtesy of the artist
[more Joseba Elorza]
Joseba Elorza (Spain)
Spanish illustrator and artist Joseba Elorza studied to become sound technician and later spent a couple of unfruitful years in art school. It was all this synesthesic hodgepodge where MiraRuido (Mira = look, see; Ruido = noise) sprang from. Today, the former sound thechnician makes a living with his unique digital collages, blended with humor, fantasy, sci-fi and surrealism. © All images courtesy of the artist
[more Joseba Elorza] Joseba Elorza (Spain)
Spanish illustrator and artist Joseba Elorza studied to become sound technician and later spent a couple of unfruitful years in art school. It was all this synesthesic hodgepodge where MiraRuido (Mira = look, see; Ruido = noise) sprang from. Today, the former sound thechnician makes a living with his unique digital collages, blended with humor, fantasy, sci-fi and surrealism. © All images courtesy of the artist
[more Joseba Elorza] Joseba Elorza (Spain)
Spanish illustrator and artist Joseba Elorza studied to become sound technician and later spent a couple of unfruitful years in art school. It was all this synesthesic hodgepodge where MiraRuido (Mira = look, see; Ruido = noise) sprang from. Today, the former sound thechnician makes a living with his unique digital collages, blended with humor, fantasy, sci-fi and surrealism. © All images courtesy of the artist
[more Joseba Elorza] Joseba Elorza (Spain)
Spanish illustrator and artist Joseba Elorza studied to become sound technician and later spent a couple of unfruitful years in art school. It was all this synesthesic hodgepodge where MiraRuido (Mira = look, see; Ruido = noise) sprang from. Today, the former sound thechnician makes a living with his unique digital collages, blended with humor, fantasy, sci-fi and surrealism. © All images courtesy of the artist
[more Joseba Elorza] Joseba Elorza (Spain)
Spanish illustrator and artist Joseba Elorza studied to become sound technician and later spent a couple of unfruitful years in art school. It was all this synesthesic hodgepodge where MiraRuido (Mira = look, see; Ruido = noise) sprang from. Today, the former sound thechnician makes a living with his unique digital collages, blended with humor, fantasy, sci-fi and surrealism. © All images courtesy of the artist
[more Joseba Elorza]
  • Bernhard Lang - Winter Aerials
  • Bernhard Lang - Winter Aerials
  • Bernhard Lang - Winter Aerials
  • Bernhard Lang - Winter Aerials
  • Bernhard Lang - Winter Aerials
  • Bernhard Lang - Winter Aerials
  • Bernhard Lang - Winter Aerials
  • Bernhard Lang - Winter Aerials
  • Bernhard Lang - Winter Aerials
  • Bernhard Lang - Winter Aerials
Bernhard Lang - Winter Aerials Bernhard Lang - Winter Aerials Bernhard Lang - Winter Aerials Bernhard Lang - Winter Aerials Bernhard Lang - Winter Aerials
  • Bernhard Lang - Harbour Aerial Views
  • Bernhard Lang - Harbour Aerial Views
  • Bernhard Lang - Harbour Aerial Views
  • Bernhard Lang - Harbour Aerial Views
  • Bernhard Lang - Harbour Aerial Views
  • Bernhard Lang - Harbour Aerial Views
  • Bernhard Lang - Harbour Aerial Views
  • Bernhard Lang - Harbour Aerial Views
  • Bernhard Lang - Harbour Aerial Views
  • Bernhard Lang - Harbour Aerial Views
Bernhard Lang - Harbour Aerial Views Bernhard Lang - Harbour Aerial Views Bernhard Lang - Harbour Aerial Views Bernhard Lang - Harbour Aerial Views Bernhard Lang - Harbour Aerial Views
  • Bernhard Lang - Aerial Views Coal Mining
  • Bernhard Lang - Aerial Views Coal Mining
  • Bernhard Lang - Aerial Views Coal Mining
  • Bernhard Lang - Aerial Views Coal Mining
  • Bernhard Lang - Aerial Views Coal Mining
  • Bernhard Lang - Aerial Views Coal Mining
  • Bernhard Lang - Aerial Views Coal Mining
  • Bernhard Lang - Aerial Views Coal Mining
  • Bernhard Lang - Aerial Views Coal Mining
  • Bernhard Lang - Aerial Views Coal Mining
Bernhard Lang - Aerial Views Coal Mining Bernhard Lang - Aerial Views Coal Mining Bernhard Lang - Aerial Views Coal Mining Bernhard Lang - Aerial Views Coal Mining Bernhard Lang - Aerial Views Coal Mining
  • Pejac (Spain) - Miniature Silhouettes and Optical Illusions
Spanish artist Pejac creates on his window miniature silhouettes in cut paper or acrylic paint. The window is then captured on camera, showing the riskiness and fragility of the art of tightrope. Over the past couple of years, Pejac has been getting recognition for his simple, clever public art and gallery work. Using brushes, pencils, acrylic paint and sand paper, he creates works that blend into their surroundings using existing elements and textures. Often socially and politically engaged, his works vary from small interventions to large mural-like pieces. (src. Hi-Fructose Magazine)
© All images courtesy of the artist
[more Pejac]
  • Pejac (Spain) - Miniature Silhouettes and Optical Illusions
Spanish artist Pejac creates on his window miniature silhouettes in cut paper or acrylic paint. The window is then captured on camera, showing the riskiness and fragility of the art of tightrope. Over the past couple of years, Pejac has been getting recognition for his simple, clever public art and gallery work. Using brushes, pencils, acrylic paint and sand paper, he creates works that blend into their surroundings using existing elements and textures. Often socially and politically engaged, his works vary from small interventions to large mural-like pieces. (src. Hi-Fructose Magazine)
© All images courtesy of the artist
[more Pejac]
  • Pejac (Spain) - Miniature Silhouettes and Optical Illusions
Spanish artist Pejac creates on his window miniature silhouettes in cut paper or acrylic paint. The window is then captured on camera, showing the riskiness and fragility of the art of tightrope. Over the past couple of years, Pejac has been getting recognition for his simple, clever public art and gallery work. Using brushes, pencils, acrylic paint and sand paper, he creates works that blend into their surroundings using existing elements and textures. Often socially and politically engaged, his works vary from small interventions to large mural-like pieces. (src. Hi-Fructose Magazine)
© All images courtesy of the artist
[more Pejac]
  • Pejac (Spain) - Miniature Silhouettes and Optical Illusions
Spanish artist Pejac creates on his window miniature silhouettes in cut paper or acrylic paint. The window is then captured on camera, showing the riskiness and fragility of the art of tightrope. Over the past couple of years, Pejac has been getting recognition for his simple, clever public art and gallery work. Using brushes, pencils, acrylic paint and sand paper, he creates works that blend into their surroundings using existing elements and textures. Often socially and politically engaged, his works vary from small interventions to large mural-like pieces. (src. Hi-Fructose Magazine)
© All images courtesy of the artist
[more Pejac]
  • Pejac (Spain) - Miniature Silhouettes and Optical Illusions
Spanish artist Pejac creates on his window miniature silhouettes in cut paper or acrylic paint. The window is then captured on camera, showing the riskiness and fragility of the art of tightrope. Over the past couple of years, Pejac has been getting recognition for his simple, clever public art and gallery work. Using brushes, pencils, acrylic paint and sand paper, he creates works that blend into their surroundings using existing elements and textures. Often socially and politically engaged, his works vary from small interventions to large mural-like pieces. (src. Hi-Fructose Magazine)
© All images courtesy of the artist
[more Pejac]
  • Pejac (Spain) - Miniature Silhouettes and Optical Illusions
Spanish artist Pejac creates on his window miniature silhouettes in cut paper or acrylic paint. The window is then captured on camera, showing the riskiness and fragility of the art of tightrope. Over the past couple of years, Pejac has been getting recognition for his simple, clever public art and gallery work. Using brushes, pencils, acrylic paint and sand paper, he creates works that blend into their surroundings using existing elements and textures. Often socially and politically engaged, his works vary from small interventions to large mural-like pieces. (src. Hi-Fructose Magazine)
© All images courtesy of the artist
[more Pejac]
  • Pejac (Spain) - Miniature Silhouettes and Optical Illusions
Spanish artist Pejac creates on his window miniature silhouettes in cut paper or acrylic paint. The window is then captured on camera, showing the riskiness and fragility of the art of tightrope. Over the past couple of years, Pejac has been getting recognition for his simple, clever public art and gallery work. Using brushes, pencils, acrylic paint and sand paper, he creates works that blend into their surroundings using existing elements and textures. Often socially and politically engaged, his works vary from small interventions to large mural-like pieces. (src. Hi-Fructose Magazine)
© All images courtesy of the artist
[more Pejac]
  • Pejac (Spain) - Miniature Silhouettes and Optical Illusions
Spanish artist Pejac creates on his window miniature silhouettes in cut paper or acrylic paint. The window is then captured on camera, showing the riskiness and fragility of the art of tightrope. Over the past couple of years, Pejac has been getting recognition for his simple, clever public art and gallery work. Using brushes, pencils, acrylic paint and sand paper, he creates works that blend into their surroundings using existing elements and textures. Often socially and politically engaged, his works vary from small interventions to large mural-like pieces. (src. Hi-Fructose Magazine)
© All images courtesy of the artist
[more Pejac]
  • Pejac (Spain) - Miniature Silhouettes and Optical Illusions
Spanish artist Pejac creates on his window miniature silhouettes in cut paper or acrylic paint. The window is then captured on camera, showing the riskiness and fragility of the art of tightrope. Over the past couple of years, Pejac has been getting recognition for his simple, clever public art and gallery work. Using brushes, pencils, acrylic paint and sand paper, he creates works that blend into their surroundings using existing elements and textures. Often socially and politically engaged, his works vary from small interventions to large mural-like pieces. (src. Hi-Fructose Magazine)
© All images courtesy of the artist
[more Pejac]
  • Pejac (Spain) - Miniature Silhouettes and Optical Illusions
Spanish artist Pejac creates on his window miniature silhouettes in cut paper or acrylic paint. The window is then captured on camera, showing the riskiness and fragility of the art of tightrope. Over the past couple of years, Pejac has been getting recognition for his simple, clever public art and gallery work. Using brushes, pencils, acrylic paint and sand paper, he creates works that blend into their surroundings using existing elements and textures. Often socially and politically engaged, his works vary from small interventions to large mural-like pieces. (src. Hi-Fructose Magazine)
© All images courtesy of the artist
[more Pejac]
Pejac (Spain) - Miniature Silhouettes and Optical Illusions
Spanish artist Pejac creates on his window miniature silhouettes in cut paper or acrylic paint. The window is then captured on camera, showing the riskiness and fragility of the art of tightrope. Over the past couple of years, Pejac has been getting recognition for his simple, clever public art and gallery work. Using brushes, pencils, acrylic paint and sand paper, he creates works that blend into their surroundings using existing elements and textures. Often socially and politically engaged, his works vary from small interventions to large mural-like pieces. (src. Hi-Fructose Magazine)
© All images courtesy of the artist
[more Pejac] Pejac (Spain) - Miniature Silhouettes and Optical Illusions
Spanish artist Pejac creates on his window miniature silhouettes in cut paper or acrylic paint. The window is then captured on camera, showing the riskiness and fragility of the art of tightrope. Over the past couple of years, Pejac has been getting recognition for his simple, clever public art and gallery work. Using brushes, pencils, acrylic paint and sand paper, he creates works that blend into their surroundings using existing elements and textures. Often socially and politically engaged, his works vary from small interventions to large mural-like pieces. (src. Hi-Fructose Magazine)
© All images courtesy of the artist
[more Pejac] Pejac (Spain) - Miniature Silhouettes and Optical Illusions
Spanish artist Pejac creates on his window miniature silhouettes in cut paper or acrylic paint. The window is then captured on camera, showing the riskiness and fragility of the art of tightrope. Over the past couple of years, Pejac has been getting recognition for his simple, clever public art and gallery work. Using brushes, pencils, acrylic paint and sand paper, he creates works that blend into their surroundings using existing elements and textures. Often socially and politically engaged, his works vary from small interventions to large mural-like pieces. (src. Hi-Fructose Magazine)
© All images courtesy of the artist
[more Pejac] Pejac (Spain) - Miniature Silhouettes and Optical Illusions
Spanish artist Pejac creates on his window miniature silhouettes in cut paper or acrylic paint. The window is then captured on camera, showing the riskiness and fragility of the art of tightrope. Over the past couple of years, Pejac has been getting recognition for his simple, clever public art and gallery work. Using brushes, pencils, acrylic paint and sand paper, he creates works that blend into their surroundings using existing elements and textures. Often socially and politically engaged, his works vary from small interventions to large mural-like pieces. (src. Hi-Fructose Magazine)
© All images courtesy of the artist
[more Pejac] Pejac (Spain) - Miniature Silhouettes and Optical Illusions
Spanish artist Pejac creates on his window miniature silhouettes in cut paper or acrylic paint. The window is then captured on camera, showing the riskiness and fragility of the art of tightrope. Over the past couple of years, Pejac has been getting recognition for his simple, clever public art and gallery work. Using brushes, pencils, acrylic paint and sand paper, he creates works that blend into their surroundings using existing elements and textures. Often socially and politically engaged, his works vary from small interventions to large mural-like pieces. (src. Hi-Fructose Magazine)
© All images courtesy of the artist
[more Pejac]
  • Pejac 
Ants, Vitry-sur-Seine, Paris (2014)Stain (2011)
  • Pejac 
Ants, Vitry-sur-Seine, Paris (2014)Stain (2011)
  • Pejac 
Ants, Vitry-sur-Seine, Paris (2014)Stain (2011)
  • Pejac 
Ants, Vitry-sur-Seine, Paris (2014)Stain (2011)
  • Pejac 
Ants, Vitry-sur-Seine, Paris (2014)Stain (2011)
  • Pejac 
Ants, Vitry-sur-Seine, Paris (2014)Stain (2011)
  • Pejac 
Ants, Vitry-sur-Seine, Paris (2014)Stain (2011)
  • Pejac 
Ants, Vitry-sur-Seine, Paris (2014)Stain (2011)
Pejac 
Ants, Vitry-sur-Seine, Paris (2014)Stain (2011) Pejac 
Ants, Vitry-sur-Seine, Paris (2014)Stain (2011) Pejac 
Ants, Vitry-sur-Seine, Paris (2014)Stain (2011) Pejac 
Ants, Vitry-sur-Seine, Paris (2014)Stain (2011)